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Title: The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.

Abstract

Land managers are increasingly implementing strategies that employ the use of fire in prescribed burns to sustain ecosystems and plan to sustain the rate of increase in its use over the next five years. In planning and executing expanded use of fire in wildland treatment it is important to estimate the human health and safety consequences, property damage, and the extent of visibility degradation from the resulting conflagration-pyrolysis gases, soot and smoke generated during flaming, smoldering and/or glowing fires. Traditional approaches have often employed the analysis of weather observations and forecasts to determine whether a prescribed burn will affect populations, property, or protected Class I areas. However, the complexity of the problem lends itself to advanced PC-based models that are simple to use for both calculating the emissions from the burning of wildland fuels and the downwind dispersion of smoke and other products of pyrolysis, distillation, and/or fuels combustion. These models will need to address the effects of residual smoldering combustion, including plume dynamics and optical effects. In this paper, we discuss a suite of tools that can be applied for analyzing dispersion. These tools include the dispersion models FIREPLUME and SMOKE, together with the meteorological preprocessor SEBMET.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
11939
Report Number(s):
ANL/EA/CP-99817
TRN: AH200119%%134
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Joint Fire Science Program Conference and Workshop, Boise, ID (US), 06/17/1999--06/19/1999; Other Information: PBD: 17 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COMBUSTION; ECOSYSTEMS; PLANNING; PLUMES; FIRES; SMOKES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; LAND RESOURCES; FORESTS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; PUBLIC HEALTH; F CODES; S CODES

Citation Formats

Brown, D. F., Dunn, W. E., Lazaro, M. A., and Policastro, A. J. The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Brown, D. F., Dunn, W. E., Lazaro, M. A., & Policastro, A. J. The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.. United States.
Brown, D. F., Dunn, W. E., Lazaro, M. A., and Policastro, A. J. Tue . "The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/11939.
@article{osti_11939,
title = {The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.},
author = {Brown, D. F. and Dunn, W. E. and Lazaro, M. A. and Policastro, A. J.},
abstractNote = {Land managers are increasingly implementing strategies that employ the use of fire in prescribed burns to sustain ecosystems and plan to sustain the rate of increase in its use over the next five years. In planning and executing expanded use of fire in wildland treatment it is important to estimate the human health and safety consequences, property damage, and the extent of visibility degradation from the resulting conflagration-pyrolysis gases, soot and smoke generated during flaming, smoldering and/or glowing fires. Traditional approaches have often employed the analysis of weather observations and forecasts to determine whether a prescribed burn will affect populations, property, or protected Class I areas. However, the complexity of the problem lends itself to advanced PC-based models that are simple to use for both calculating the emissions from the burning of wildland fuels and the downwind dispersion of smoke and other products of pyrolysis, distillation, and/or fuels combustion. These models will need to address the effects of residual smoldering combustion, including plume dynamics and optical effects. In this paper, we discuss a suite of tools that can be applied for analyzing dispersion. These tools include the dispersion models FIREPLUME and SMOKE, together with the meteorological preprocessor SEBMET.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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