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Title: Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

Abstract

This paper discusses Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1191808
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-95218
AA9020100
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Energy Journal, 35(Special Issue):Article No. 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Clarke, Leon E., Fawcett, Allen, Weyant, John, McFarland, Jim, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, and Zhou, Yuyu. Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.2.
Clarke, Leon E., Fawcett, Allen, Weyant, John, McFarland, Jim, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, & Zhou, Yuyu. Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise. United States. doi:10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.2.
Clarke, Leon E., Fawcett, Allen, Weyant, John, McFarland, Jim, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, and Zhou, Yuyu. Mon . "Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise". United States. doi:10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.2.
@article{osti_1191808,
title = {Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise},
author = {Clarke, Leon E. and Fawcett, Allen and Weyant, John and McFarland, Jim and Chaturvedi, Vaibhav and Zhou, Yuyu},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise},
doi = {10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.2},
journal = {The Energy Journal, 35(Special Issue):Article No. 2},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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