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Title: Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.

Abstract

This application note describes how to model steady-state power flows and transient events in electric power grids with the SPICE-compatible Xyce TM Parallel Electronic Simulator developed at Sandia National Labs. This application notes provides a brief tutorial on the basic devices (branches, bus shunts, transformers and generators) found in power grids. The focus is on the features supported and assumptions made by the Xyce models for power grid elements. It then provides a detailed explanation, including working Xyce netlists, for simulating some simple power grid examples such as the IEEE 14-bus test case.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1191079
Report Number(s):
SAND-2015-5233
594456
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sholander, Peter E. Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1191079.
Sholander, Peter E. Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.. United States. doi:10.2172/1191079.
Sholander, Peter E. Mon . "Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.". United States. doi:10.2172/1191079. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1191079.
@article{osti_1191079,
title = {Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.},
author = {Sholander, Peter E.},
abstractNote = {This application note describes how to model steady-state power flows and transient events in electric power grids with the SPICE-compatible Xyce TM Parallel Electronic Simulator developed at Sandia National Labs. This application notes provides a brief tutorial on the basic devices (branches, bus shunts, transformers and generators) found in power grids. The focus is on the features supported and assumptions made by the Xyce models for power grid elements. It then provides a detailed explanation, including working Xyce netlists, for simulating some simple power grid examples such as the IEEE 14-bus test case.},
doi = {10.2172/1191079},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Technical Report:

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