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Title: HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

Abstract

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney (Australia). Centre for Vascular Research.
  3. Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT (United States)
  4. Merck Research Labs., Rahway, NJ (United States)
  5. University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1190957
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1407290
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Zhang, Meng, Charles, River, Tong, Huimin, Zhang, Lei, Patel, Mili, Wang, Francis, Rames, Matthew J., Ren, Amy, Rye, Kerry-Anne, Qiu, Xiayang, Johns, Douglas G., Charles, M. Arthur, and Ren, Gang. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1038/srep08741.
Zhang, Meng, Charles, River, Tong, Huimin, Zhang, Lei, Patel, Mili, Wang, Francis, Rames, Matthew J., Ren, Amy, Rye, Kerry-Anne, Qiu, Xiayang, Johns, Douglas G., Charles, M. Arthur, & Ren, Gang. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. United States. doi:10.1038/srep08741.
Zhang, Meng, Charles, River, Tong, Huimin, Zhang, Lei, Patel, Mili, Wang, Francis, Rames, Matthew J., Ren, Amy, Rye, Kerry-Anne, Qiu, Xiayang, Johns, Douglas G., Charles, M. Arthur, and Ren, Gang. Wed . "HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation". United States. doi:10.1038/srep08741. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1190957.
@article{osti_1190957,
title = {HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation},
author = {Zhang, Meng and Charles, River and Tong, Huimin and Zhang, Lei and Patel, Mili and Wang, Francis and Rames, Matthew J. and Ren, Amy and Rye, Kerry-Anne and Qiu, Xiayang and Johns, Douglas G. and Charles, M. Arthur and Ren, Gang},
abstractNote = {Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.},
doi = {10.1038/srep08741},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 3,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Wed Mar 04 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

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Cited by: 15 works
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Works referenced in this record:

Scalable molecular dynamics with NAMD
journal, January 2005

  • Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei
  • Journal of Computational Chemistry, Vol. 26, Issue 16, p. 1781-1802
  • DOI: 10.1002/jcc.20289