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Title: Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

Abstract

A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1188259
Report Number(s):
BNL-107252-2015-CP
R&D Project: KBCH139; KB0202011; TRN: US1500255
DOE Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15), Richmond, VA (United States), 3-8 May 2015
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; MUON BEAMS; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 01-10; CAVITY RESONATORS; RF SYSTEMS; DESIGN; HYDROGEN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; BEAM PRODUCTION; PERFORMANCE; SIMULATION; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; BEAM BUNCHERS; BEAM COOLING

Citation Formats

Stratakis, Diktys, and Neuffer, David V. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Stratakis, Diktys, & Neuffer, David V. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source. United States.
Stratakis, Diktys, and Neuffer, David V. 2015. "Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1188259.
@article{osti_1188259,
title = {Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source},
author = {Stratakis, Diktys and Neuffer, David V.},
abstractNote = {A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.
  • The influence of an intense beam in a high-pressure gas filled RF cavity has been measured by using a 400 MeV proton beam in the Mucool Test Area at Fermilab. The ionization process generates dense plasma in the cavity and the resultant power loss to the plasma is determined by measuring the cavity voltage on a sampling oscilloscope. The energy loss has been observed with various peak RF field gradients (E), gas pressures (p), and beam intensities in nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Observed RF energy dissipation in single electron (dw) in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases was 2 10{supmore » -17} and 3 10{sup -17} Joules/RF cycle at E/p = 8 V/cm/Torr, respectively. More detailed dw measurement have been done in H{sub 2} gas at three different gas pressures. There is a clear discrepancy between the observed dw and analytical one. The discrepancy may be due to the gas density effect that has already been observed in various experiments.« less
  • High-gradient, pressurized RF cavities are investigated as a means to improve the capture efficiency, to effect phase rotation to reduce momentum spread, and to reduce the angular divergence of a muon beam. Starting close to the pion production target to take advantage of the short incident proton bunch, a series of pressurized RF cavities imbedded in a strong solenoidal field is used to capture, cool, and bunch the muon beam. We discuss the anticipated improvements from this approach to the first stage of a muon cooling channel as well as the requirements of the RF cavities needed to provide highmore » gradients while operating in intense magnetic and radiation fields.« less
  • RF cavities pressurized with hydrogen gas may provide effective muon beam ionization cooling needed for muon colliders. Recent 805 MHz test cell studies reported below include the first use of SF{sub 6} dopant to reduce the effects of the electrons that will be produced by the ionization cooling process in hydrogen or helium. Measurements of maximum gradient in the Paschen region are compared to a simulation model for a 0.01% SF{sub 6} doping of hydrogen. The observed good agreement of the model with the measurements is a prerequisite to the investigation of other dopants.