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Title: Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

Abstract

State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1186061
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; SOLAR; PHOTOVOLTAIC; PEROVSKITE CRYSTAL; SOLAR CELL; EFFICIENCY; NANOTECHNOLOGY; CRYSTALLINE RING

Citation Formats

Mohite, Aditya, and Nie, Wanyi. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Mohite, Aditya, & Nie, Wanyi. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals. United States.
Mohite, Aditya, and Nie, Wanyi. 2015. "Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1186061.
@article{osti_1186061,
title = {Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals},
author = {Mohite, Aditya and Nie, Wanyi},
abstractNote = {State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 1
}
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