skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

Abstract

This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1185881
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 40th workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, stanford, CA, USA, 20150126, 20150128
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Polsky, Yarom, Bingham, Philip R, Bilheux, Hassina Z, and Carmichael, Justin R. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Polsky, Yarom, Bingham, Philip R, Bilheux, Hassina Z, & Carmichael, Justin R. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging. United States.
Polsky, Yarom, Bingham, Philip R, Bilheux, Hassina Z, and Carmichael, Justin R. Thu . "Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1185881.
@article{osti_1185881,
title = {Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging},
author = {Polsky, Yarom and Bingham, Philip R and Bilheux, Hassina Z and Carmichael, Justin R},
abstractNote = {This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • A high-output, transportable neutron generator has been developed to measure mass flow velocities in reactor safety tests using the Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) Technique. The PNA generator produces >10/sup 10/ 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. The Millisecond Pulse (MSP) Neutron Tube, developed for this application, has an expected operational life of 1000 pulses, and it limits the generator pulse repetition rate to 12 pulses/minute. A semiconductor neutron detector is included in the generator package to monitor the neutron output. The control unit, which can be operated manually or remotely, also contains a digital display with amore » BCD output for the neutron monitor information. The digital logic of the unit controls the safety interlocks and rejects transient signals which could accidently fire the generator.« less
  • One of the major concerns with steam generator operation is the tube vibration caused by turbulent flow buffeting. The vibration can cause wear on the tube joints, which may eventually lead to ruptures and leaks. When the cumulative leaks result in a major loss of fluid, the plant needs to be shut down, and the leaking tubes must be either plugged or removed. This repair procedure can be very costly. To help avoid this problem, experimental tests need to be performed to test the empirical correlations that predict the behavior of the turbulent flow around the tubes. In this experiment,more » the particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental measurement technique was used to capture the flow velocity field around a cylindrical tube.« less
  • Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a flow visualization method that can produce qualitative and quantitative full-field maps for fluid flow parameters (such as velocity and shear stress) over an extended area. The use of digital cameras for data acquisition to study high-speed fluid flows is usually limited by the camera frame acquisition rate. The velocity of the fluid under study must be limited to ensure that particles suspended in the flow field remain in the camera's focal plane in successive images. The use of digital cameras for data acquisition is desirable to simplify and expedite the data analysis. A methodmore » is presented in this paper that will measure changes in the flow field that occur at the relatively fast framing rate of 100 to 320 its per frame. However, to achieve this high framing rate, the laser will be operated in a double-pulse mode with one camera exposed twice. The directional ambiguity presented by the double exposure can be resolved by capturing a single exposure of the second pulse with a second digital camera. The study of collapsing steam bubbles also presents the problem of distinguishing between the light reflected by the liquid-gas interface and the light refracted by the surrounding tracer particles. This problem was resolved through the use of fluorescent seeds and appropriate filters. The fitter blocked most of the green light reflected by the bubbles and passed the red light emitted by the fluorescent seeds.« less
  • During an accident, nuclear systems require devices that maintain long-term cooling of the nuclear fuel. This prevents the disruption of the fuel elements and other vital parts of the reactor that may result in the release of radioactivity. During this exponential decay, the nature of the cooling systems must be examined. This experimental study is primarily the examination of the natural convection flow between rectangular heating elements. Various flow patterns were studied. Convective flow in a liquid-filled heated cavity is investigated using a novel approach, digital imaging pulsed laser velocimetry. This method has several advantages over past methods such asmore » hot wire anemometry and laser Doppler velocimetry. Digital imaging pulsed laser velocimetry is not only a method that supplied qualitative features but also quantitative information. The image is digitized and is manipulated to provide significant data such as centroids, gray levels, and other areas of interest in order to compute the velocity profiles. Each frame holds the equivalent of >1 Mbyte of information. The frame analysis is done with a PC/AT-compatible computer and an image processing unit in the laboratory, and the actual calculation of the flow trajectories is carried out on the VAX 8650 computing system.« less
  • Abstract not provided.