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Title: Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation

Abstract

The present manuscript consists of proof of concept experiments involving direct measurements and detailed chemical speciation from the top ring zone of a running engine. The work uses a naturally aspirated single cylinder utility engine that has been modified to allow direct liquid sample acquisition from behind the top ring. Samples were analyzed and spectated using gas chromatographic techniques. Results show that the liquid mixture in the top ring zone is neither neat lubricant nor fuel but a combination of the two with unique chemical properties. At the tested steady state no-load operating condition, the chemical species of the top ring zone liquid were found to be highly dependent on boiling point, where both low reactivity higher boiling point fuel species and lubricant are observed to be the dominant constituents. The results show that at least for the tested condition, approximately 25% of the top ring zone is comprised of gasoline fuel like molecules, which are dominated by high octane number aromatic species, while the remainder of the liquid is comprised of lubricant like species.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1185760
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SAE World Congress, Detroit, MI, USA, 20150413, 20150416
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Splitter, Derek A, Burrows, Barry Clay, and Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur. Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Splitter, Derek A, Burrows, Barry Clay, & Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur. Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation. United States.
Splitter, Derek A, Burrows, Barry Clay, and Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur. Thu . "Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1185760,
title = {Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation},
author = {Splitter, Derek A and Burrows, Barry Clay and Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur},
abstractNote = {The present manuscript consists of proof of concept experiments involving direct measurements and detailed chemical speciation from the top ring zone of a running engine. The work uses a naturally aspirated single cylinder utility engine that has been modified to allow direct liquid sample acquisition from behind the top ring. Samples were analyzed and spectated using gas chromatographic techniques. Results show that the liquid mixture in the top ring zone is neither neat lubricant nor fuel but a combination of the two with unique chemical properties. At the tested steady state no-load operating condition, the chemical species of the top ring zone liquid were found to be highly dependent on boiling point, where both low reactivity higher boiling point fuel species and lubricant are observed to be the dominant constituents. The results show that at least for the tested condition, approximately 25% of the top ring zone is comprised of gasoline fuel like molecules, which are dominated by high octane number aromatic species, while the remainder of the liquid is comprised of lubricant like species.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
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