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Title: Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering

Abstract

To accelerate the introduction of new materials and components, the development of metal casting processes requires the teaming between different disciplines, as multi-physical phenomena have to be considered simultaneously for the process design and optimization of mechanical properties. The required models for physical phenomena as well as their validation status for metal casting are reviewed. The data on materials properties, model validation, and relevant microstructure for materials properties are highlighted. One vehicle to accelerate the development of new materials is through combined experimental-computational efforts. Integrated computational/experimental practices are reviewed; strengths and weaknesses are identified with respect to metal casting processes. Specifically, the examples are given for the knowledge base established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and computer models for predicting casting defects and microstructure distribution in aluminum alloy components.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1185548
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ASME 2014 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Montreal, Canada, 20141114, 20141114
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sabau, Adrian S, Porter, Wallace D, Roy, Shibayan, and Shyam, Amit. Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Sabau, Adrian S, Porter, Wallace D, Roy, Shibayan, & Shyam, Amit. Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering. United States.
Sabau, Adrian S, Porter, Wallace D, Roy, Shibayan, and Shyam, Amit. Wed . "Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1185548.
@article{osti_1185548,
title = {Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering},
author = {Sabau, Adrian S and Porter, Wallace D and Roy, Shibayan and Shyam, Amit},
abstractNote = {To accelerate the introduction of new materials and components, the development of metal casting processes requires the teaming between different disciplines, as multi-physical phenomena have to be considered simultaneously for the process design and optimization of mechanical properties. The required models for physical phenomena as well as their validation status for metal casting are reviewed. The data on materials properties, model validation, and relevant microstructure for materials properties are highlighted. One vehicle to accelerate the development of new materials is through combined experimental-computational efforts. Integrated computational/experimental practices are reviewed; strengths and weaknesses are identified with respect to metal casting processes. Specifically, the examples are given for the knowledge base established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and computer models for predicting casting defects and microstructure distribution in aluminum alloy components.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}

Conference:
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