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Title: Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison

Abstract

Borofloat ® borosilicate float glass and Starphire ® soda-lime silicate float glass are used in transparent protective systems. They are known to respond differently in some ballistic and triaxial loading conditions, and efforts are underway to understand the causes of those differences. Toward that, a suite of test and material characterizations were completed in the present study on both glasses so to identify what differences exist among them. Compositional, physical properties, elastic properties, flaw size distributions and concentrations, tensile/flexure strength, fracture toughness, spherical indentation and hardness, transmission electron microscopy, striae, high pressure responses via diamond anvil cell testing, laser shock differences, and internal porosity were examined. Differences between these two float glasses were identified for many of these properties and characteristics, and the role of three (striae, high pressures where permanent densification can initiate, and sub-micron-sized porosity) lack understanding and deserve further attention. Lastly, the contributing roles of any of those properties or characteristics to triaxial or ballistic loading responses are not definitive; however, they provide potential correlations that may lead to improved understanding and management of loading responses in glasses used in transparent protective systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
  2. Southwest Research Inst. (SwRI), San Antonio, TX (United States). Engineering Dynamics Dept.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1185520
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; 14B658801; NFE-10-03121
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Applied Glass Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1286
Publisher:
American Ceramic Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Wereszczak, Andrew A., and Anderson Jr., Charles E.. Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1111/ijag.12095.
Wereszczak, Andrew A., & Anderson Jr., Charles E.. Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison. United States. doi:10.1111/ijag.12095.
Wereszczak, Andrew A., and Anderson Jr., Charles E.. Tue . "Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison". United States. doi:10.1111/ijag.12095. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1185520.
@article{osti_1185520,
title = {Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison},
author = {Wereszczak, Andrew A. and Anderson Jr., Charles E.},
abstractNote = {Borofloat® borosilicate float glass and Starphire® soda-lime silicate float glass are used in transparent protective systems. They are known to respond differently in some ballistic and triaxial loading conditions, and efforts are underway to understand the causes of those differences. Toward that, a suite of test and material characterizations were completed in the present study on both glasses so to identify what differences exist among them. Compositional, physical properties, elastic properties, flaw size distributions and concentrations, tensile/flexure strength, fracture toughness, spherical indentation and hardness, transmission electron microscopy, striae, high pressure responses via diamond anvil cell testing, laser shock differences, and internal porosity were examined. Differences between these two float glasses were identified for many of these properties and characteristics, and the role of three (striae, high pressures where permanent densification can initiate, and sub-micron-sized porosity) lack understanding and deserve further attention. Lastly, the contributing roles of any of those properties or characteristics to triaxial or ballistic loading responses are not definitive; however, they provide potential correlations that may lead to improved understanding and management of loading responses in glasses used in transparent protective systems.},
doi = {10.1111/ijag.12095},
journal = {International Journal of Applied Glass Science},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Oct 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6works
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