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Title: HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

Abstract

Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1185356
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Eleventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerators, Brugges, Belgium, 20130804, 20130809
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Blokland, Willem, Plum, Michael A, Peters, Charles C, Brown, David L, and Galambos, John D. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Blokland, Willem, Plum, Michael A, Peters, Charles C, Brown, David L, & Galambos, John D. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES. United States.
Blokland, Willem, Plum, Michael A, Peters, Charles C, Brown, David L, and Galambos, John D. 2013. "HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1185356,
title = {HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES},
author = {Blokland, Willem and Plum, Michael A and Peters, Charles C and Brown, David L and Galambos, John D},
abstractNote = {Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • Recently revised estimates of target gain have added additional optimistic inputs to the interface between targets, accelerators and fusion chamber beam transport. But it remains valid that neutralization of the beams in the fusion chamber is useful if ion charge state Z > 1 or if > 1 kA per beamlet is to be propagated. Some engineering and economic considerations favor higher currents.
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