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Title: Shape-Shifting Plastic

Abstract

A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1185044
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SHAPE-SHIFTING; PLASTIC; TEMPERATURE.

Citation Formats

None. Shape-Shifting Plastic. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
None. Shape-Shifting Plastic. United States.
None. 2015. "Shape-Shifting Plastic". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1185044.
@article{osti_1185044,
title = {Shape-Shifting Plastic},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
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