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Title: The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change

Abstract

On June 4, 2014, the Henry M. Jackson Foundation and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hosted a groundbreaking symposium in Seattle, Washington, that brought together 36 leaders from federal agencies, state and local governments, NGOs, business, and academia. The participants examined approaches and tools to help decision makers make informed choices about the climate and security risks they face. The following executive summary is based on the day’s discussions and examines the problem of climate change and its impact on national security, the responses to date, and future considerations.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1183632
Report Number(s):
PNNL-23495
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Climate Change; National Security; Intersection; Decision Makers; Approaches; Pacific Northwest

Citation Formats

Hund, Gretchen, Fankhauser, Jana G., Kurzrok, Andrew J., and Sandusky, Jessica A.. The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1183632.
Hund, Gretchen, Fankhauser, Jana G., Kurzrok, Andrew J., & Sandusky, Jessica A.. The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change. United States. doi:10.2172/1183632.
Hund, Gretchen, Fankhauser, Jana G., Kurzrok, Andrew J., and Sandusky, Jessica A.. Tue . "The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change". United States. doi:10.2172/1183632. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1183632.
@article{osti_1183632,
title = {The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change},
author = {Hund, Gretchen and Fankhauser, Jana G. and Kurzrok, Andrew J. and Sandusky, Jessica A.},
abstractNote = {On June 4, 2014, the Henry M. Jackson Foundation and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hosted a groundbreaking symposium in Seattle, Washington, that brought together 36 leaders from federal agencies, state and local governments, NGOs, business, and academia. The participants examined approaches and tools to help decision makers make informed choices about the climate and security risks they face. The following executive summary is based on the day’s discussions and examines the problem of climate change and its impact on national security, the responses to date, and future considerations.},
doi = {10.2172/1183632},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 29 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 29 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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