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Title: Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

Abstract

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [5]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. New York Univ., Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)
  3. National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Inst. of Health, Betheseda, MD (United States)
  4. Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)
  5. National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Inst. of Health, Betheseda, MD (United States); National Inst. on Drug Abuse, National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1183290
Report Number(s):
BNL-107778-2015-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0362-4803; R&D Project: MO-085; KP1602010
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0362-4803
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; monoamine oxidase; PET; radiotracer chemistry; human studies; positron emission tomography (PET) facility

Citation Formats

Fowler, Joanna S., Logan, Jean, Shumay, Elena, Alia-Klein, Nelly, Wang, Gene-Jack, and Volkow, Nora D. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1002/jlcr.3247.
Fowler, Joanna S., Logan, Jean, Shumay, Elena, Alia-Klein, Nelly, Wang, Gene-Jack, & Volkow, Nora D. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies. United States. doi:10.1002/jlcr.3247.
Fowler, Joanna S., Logan, Jean, Shumay, Elena, Alia-Klein, Nelly, Wang, Gene-Jack, and Volkow, Nora D. Sun . "Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies". United States. doi:10.1002/jlcr.3247. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1183290.
@article{osti_1183290,
title = {Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies},
author = {Fowler, Joanna S. and Logan, Jean and Shumay, Elena and Alia-Klein, Nelly and Wang, Gene-Jack and Volkow, Nora D.},
abstractNote = {Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.},
doi = {10.1002/jlcr.3247},
journal = {Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals},
number = 3,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

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