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Title: Puzzles in hadronic transitions of heavy quarkonium with two pion emission

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1180639
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; FPA2010-21750-C02-02; 283286; CSD2007-00042
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review D
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-12-23 14:17:22; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Segovia, Jorge, Entem, D. R., and Fernández, F. Puzzles in hadronic transitions of heavy quarkonium with two pion emission. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.91.014002.
Segovia, Jorge, Entem, D. R., & Fernández, F. Puzzles in hadronic transitions of heavy quarkonium with two pion emission. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.91.014002.
Segovia, Jorge, Entem, D. R., and Fernández, F. Tue . "Puzzles in hadronic transitions of heavy quarkonium with two pion emission". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.91.014002.
@article{osti_1180639,
title = {Puzzles in hadronic transitions of heavy quarkonium with two pion emission},
author = {Segovia, Jorge and Entem, D. R. and Fernández, F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.91.014002},
journal = {Physical Review D},
number = 1,
volume = 91,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 06 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Tue Jan 06 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.014002

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 9works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • We study the anomalously large rates of some hadronic transitions observed in heavy quarkonia using a constituent quark model that has been successful in describing meson and baryon phenomenology. QCD multipole expansion (QCDME) is used to describe the hadronic transitions. The hybrid intermediate states needed in the QCDME method are calculated in a natural, parameter-free extension of our constituent quark model based on the quark confining string scheme. Some of the anomalies are explained due to the presence of a hybrid state with a mass near the one of the decaying resonance, whereas others are justified by the presence ofmore » molecular components in the wave function. Certain unexpected results are pointed out.« less
  • The anomalously large rates of some hadronic transitions from quarkonium are studied using QCD multipole expansion (QCDME) in the framework of a constituent quark model which has been successful in describing hadronic phenomenology. The hybrid intermediate states needed in the QCDME method are calculated in a natural extension of our constituent quark model based on the Quark Confining String (QCS) scheme. Some of the anomalies are explained due to the presence of an hybrid state with a mass near the mass of the decaying resonance whereas other are justified by the presence of molecular components in the wave function. Somemore » unexpected results are pointed out.« less
  • A systematic calculation of the coupled-channel effects in hadronic transitions in the {ital c{bar c}} and {ital b{bar b}} systems is given. The unitarized quark model based on the {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 0} quark-pair-creation mechanism is adopted as the coupled-channel model. The emitted pions can now be produced both from the conventional Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka- (OZI) forbidden process described by QCD multipole-gluon emissions and from the light-quark loop through an OZI-allowed process described by the quark-pair-creation model. There is interference between the two kinds of transition amplitudes. Taking the experimental values of {Gamma}({psi}{prime}{r arrow}{ital J}/{psi} {pi}{pi}) and {ital d}{Gamma}({psi}{prime}{r arrow}{ital J}/{psi} {pi}{pi})/{italmore » dM}{sub {pi}{pi}} as inputs to determine the two unknown parameters in the theory, we predict the transition rates and {ital M}{sub {pi}{pi}} distributions in the {ital b{bar b}} system. The obtained rates for {Upsilon}{prime}{r arrow}{Upsilon}{pi}{pi}, {Upsilon}{prime}{prime}{r arrow}{Upsilon}{pi}{pi}, {Upsilon}{prime}{prime}{r arrow}{Upsilon}{prime}{pi}{pi} and the distribution {ital d}{Gamma}({Upsilon}{prime}{r arrow}{Upsilon}{pi}{pi})/{ital dM}{sub {pi}{pi}} are in good agreement with the experiments. For {ital d}{Gamma}({Upsilon}{prime}{prime}{r arrow}{Upsilon}{pi}{pi})/{ital dM}{sub {pi}{pi}}, the present theory does give a bigger low-{ital M}{sub {pi}{pi}} distribution than the pure QCD multipole expansion does, but it is still too small to fit the CLEO data.« less
  • Two-pion transitions in charmonium and bottomonium are considered with the leading relativistic effects taken into account. It is estimated that the contribution of the chromo-magnetic interaction of the charmed quarks to the amplitude of the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{pi}J/{psi} is at the level of (15-20)%. This contribution is enhanced by a factor of 3 in the decay {eta}{sub c}(2S){yields}{pi}{pi}{eta}{sub c}, producing a significant modification of the rate and the spectrum in the latter decay. It is also suggested that the peculiar observed spectrum in the decay {upsilon}(3S){yields}{pi}{pi}{upsilon} can be explained by a relative prominence of the relativistic terms, if the leading nonrelativisticmore » quarkonium amplitude is dynamically suppressed. Also discussed are the effects of the final state interaction between the pions.« less
  • A golden age for heavy-quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth tomore » BESIII; the B-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations at BESIII, the LHC, RHIC, FAIR, the Super Flavor and/or Tau-Charm factories, JLab, the ILC, and beyond. The list of newly found conventional states expanded to include h{sub c}(1P), {chi}{sub c2} (2P), B{sub c}{sup +}, and {eta}{sub b} (1S). In addition, the unexpected and still-fascinating X(3872) has been joined by more than a dozen other charmonium- and bottomonium-like 'XYZ' states that appear to lie outside the quark model. Many of these still need experimental confirmation. The plethora of new states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c{bar c}, b{bar b}, and b{bar c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. Lattice QCD has grown from a tool with computational possibilities to an industrial-strength effort now dependent more on insight and innovation than pure computational power. New effective field theories for the description of quarkonium in different regimes have been developed and brought to a high degree of sophistication, thus enabling precise and solid theoretical predictions. Many expected decays and transitions have either been measured with precision or for the first time, but the confusing patterns of decays, both above and below open-flavor thresholds, endure and have deepened. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.« less