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Title: Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

Abstract

This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource ismore » located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [5];  [1];  [1];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10] more »;  [9];  [1];  [1];  [9];  [1];  [1];  [6];  [1];  [1];  [11];  [6];  [12];  [1];  [13];  [14];  [12];  [1];  [1];  [10];  [12];  [15];  [8];  [1];  [1] « less
  1. Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)
  2. HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States)
  3. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  4. Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States)
  5. Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States)
  6. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)
  7. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  8. Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States)
  9. Technip, Paris (France)
  10. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)
  11. New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States)
  12. Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States)
  13. MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States)
  14. Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States)
  15. Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1179442
Report Number(s):
DOE-UMAINE-EE-2981
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0002981
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Dagher, Habib, Viselli, Anthony, Goupee, Andrew, Thaler, Jeffrey, Brady, Damian, Browne, Peter, Browning, James, Chung, Jade, Coulling, Alexander, Deese, Heather, Fowler, Matthew, Holberton, Rebecca, Anant, Jain, Jalbert, Dustin, Johnson, Theresa, Jonkman, Jason, Karlson, Benjamin, Kimball, Richard, Koo, Bonjun, Lackner, Matthew, Lambrakos, Kostas, Lankowski, Matthew, Leopold, Adrienne, Lim, Ho-Joon, Mangum, Linda, Martin, Heather, Masciola, Marco, Maynard, Melissa, McCleave, James, Mizrahi, Robert, Molta, Paul, Pershing, Andrew, Pettigrew, Neal, Prowell, Ian, Qua, Andrew, Sherwood, Graham, Snape, Thomas, Steneck, Robert, Stewart, Gordon, Stockwell, Jason, Swift, Andrew H. P., Thomas, Dale, Viselli, Elizabeth, and Zydlewski, Gayle. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1179442.
Dagher, Habib, Viselli, Anthony, Goupee, Andrew, Thaler, Jeffrey, Brady, Damian, Browne, Peter, Browning, James, Chung, Jade, Coulling, Alexander, Deese, Heather, Fowler, Matthew, Holberton, Rebecca, Anant, Jain, Jalbert, Dustin, Johnson, Theresa, Jonkman, Jason, Karlson, Benjamin, Kimball, Richard, Koo, Bonjun, Lackner, Matthew, Lambrakos, Kostas, Lankowski, Matthew, Leopold, Adrienne, Lim, Ho-Joon, Mangum, Linda, Martin, Heather, Masciola, Marco, Maynard, Melissa, McCleave, James, Mizrahi, Robert, Molta, Paul, Pershing, Andrew, Pettigrew, Neal, Prowell, Ian, Qua, Andrew, Sherwood, Graham, Snape, Thomas, Steneck, Robert, Stewart, Gordon, Stockwell, Jason, Swift, Andrew H. P., Thomas, Dale, Viselli, Elizabeth, & Zydlewski, Gayle. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013. United States. doi:10.2172/1179442.
Dagher, Habib, Viselli, Anthony, Goupee, Andrew, Thaler, Jeffrey, Brady, Damian, Browne, Peter, Browning, James, Chung, Jade, Coulling, Alexander, Deese, Heather, Fowler, Matthew, Holberton, Rebecca, Anant, Jain, Jalbert, Dustin, Johnson, Theresa, Jonkman, Jason, Karlson, Benjamin, Kimball, Richard, Koo, Bonjun, Lackner, Matthew, Lambrakos, Kostas, Lankowski, Matthew, Leopold, Adrienne, Lim, Ho-Joon, Mangum, Linda, Martin, Heather, Masciola, Marco, Maynard, Melissa, McCleave, James, Mizrahi, Robert, Molta, Paul, Pershing, Andrew, Pettigrew, Neal, Prowell, Ian, Qua, Andrew, Sherwood, Graham, Snape, Thomas, Steneck, Robert, Stewart, Gordon, Stockwell, Jason, Swift, Andrew H. P., Thomas, Dale, Viselli, Elizabeth, and Zydlewski, Gayle. Tue . "Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013". United States. doi:10.2172/1179442. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1179442.
@article{osti_1179442,
title = {Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013},
author = {Dagher, Habib and Viselli, Anthony and Goupee, Andrew and Thaler, Jeffrey and Brady, Damian and Browne, Peter and Browning, James and Chung, Jade and Coulling, Alexander and Deese, Heather and Fowler, Matthew and Holberton, Rebecca and Anant, Jain and Jalbert, Dustin and Johnson, Theresa and Jonkman, Jason and Karlson, Benjamin and Kimball, Richard and Koo, Bonjun and Lackner, Matthew and Lambrakos, Kostas and Lankowski, Matthew and Leopold, Adrienne and Lim, Ho-Joon and Mangum, Linda and Martin, Heather and Masciola, Marco and Maynard, Melissa and McCleave, James and Mizrahi, Robert and Molta, Paul and Pershing, Andrew and Pettigrew, Neal and Prowell, Ian and Qua, Andrew and Sherwood, Graham and Snape, Thomas and Steneck, Robert and Stewart, Gordon and Stockwell, Jason and Swift, Andrew H. P. and Thomas, Dale and Viselli, Elizabeth and Zydlewski, Gayle},
abstractNote = {This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials},
doi = {10.2172/1179442},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {6}
}