skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Single-Crystalline InGaAs/InP Dense Micro-Pillar Forest on Poly-Silicon Substrates for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells

Abstract

The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a photovoltaic system high conversion efficiency (>20%) using high quality III-V compound-based three-dimensional micro-structures on silicon and poly-silicon. Such a PV-system could be of very low cost due to minimum usages of III-V materials. This project will address the barriers that currently hamper the performance of solar cells based on three-dimensional micro-structures. To accomplish this goal the project is divided into 4 tasks, each dealing with a different aspect of the project: materials quality, micropillar growth control, light management, and pillar based solar cells. Materials Quality: the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) - by which is meant here the internal fluorescence yield - of the micro-pillars has to be increased. We aim at achieving an IQE of 45% by the end of the first year. By the end of the second year there will be a go-no-go milestone of 65% IQE. By the end of year 3 and 4 we aim to achieve 75% and 90% IQE, respectively. Micropillar growth control: dense forests of micropillars with high fill ratios need to be grown. Pillars within forests should show minimum variations in size. We aim at achieving fill ratios of 2%, 10%, >15%,more » >20% in years 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Variations in dimension should be minimized by site-controlled growth of pillars. By the end of year 1 we will aim at achieving site-controlled growth with > 15% yield. By end of year 2 the variation of critical pillar dimensions should be less than 25%. Light management: high light absorption in the spectral range of the sun has been to be demonstrated for the micropillar forests. By the end of year 1 we will employ FDTD simulation techniques to demonstrate that pillar forests with fill ratios <20% can achieve 99% light absorption. By end of year 2 our original goal was to demonstrate >85% absorption. By end of year 3 > 90% absorption should be demonstrated. Pillar based solar cells: devices will be studied to explore ways to achieve high open-circuit voltages which will lead to high efficiency micropillar-based solar cells. We will start on single pillar devices and the findings in these studies should pave the way for devices based on forests/ arrays of pillars. By the end of the second year we aim to demonstrate a single pillar device with an open-circuit voltage of 0.7 V, as well as a pillar-forest based device with 8% conversion efficiency. By the end of year 3 these numbers should be improved to 0.9 V open-circuit voltage for single pillar devices and >15% efficiency for forest/array-based devices. We will aim to realize a device with 20% efficiency by the end of the project period.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1178992
Report Number(s):
DOE-UC Berkeley-0005316-Q13
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0005316
Resource Type:
Other
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chang-Hasnain, Constance. Single-Crystalline InGaAs/InP Dense Micro-Pillar Forest on Poly-Silicon Substrates for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Chang-Hasnain, Constance. Single-Crystalline InGaAs/InP Dense Micro-Pillar Forest on Poly-Silicon Substrates for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells. United States.
Chang-Hasnain, Constance. Mon . "Single-Crystalline InGaAs/InP Dense Micro-Pillar Forest on Poly-Silicon Substrates for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1178992.
@article{osti_1178992,
title = {Single-Crystalline InGaAs/InP Dense Micro-Pillar Forest on Poly-Silicon Substrates for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells},
author = {Chang-Hasnain, Constance},
abstractNote = {The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a photovoltaic system high conversion efficiency (>20%) using high quality III-V compound-based three-dimensional micro-structures on silicon and poly-silicon. Such a PV-system could be of very low cost due to minimum usages of III-V materials. This project will address the barriers that currently hamper the performance of solar cells based on three-dimensional micro-structures. To accomplish this goal the project is divided into 4 tasks, each dealing with a different aspect of the project: materials quality, micropillar growth control, light management, and pillar based solar cells. Materials Quality: the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) - by which is meant here the internal fluorescence yield - of the micro-pillars has to be increased. We aim at achieving an IQE of 45% by the end of the first year. By the end of the second year there will be a go-no-go milestone of 65% IQE. By the end of year 3 and 4 we aim to achieve 75% and 90% IQE, respectively. Micropillar growth control: dense forests of micropillars with high fill ratios need to be grown. Pillars within forests should show minimum variations in size. We aim at achieving fill ratios of 2%, 10%, >15%, >20% in years 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Variations in dimension should be minimized by site-controlled growth of pillars. By the end of year 1 we will aim at achieving site-controlled growth with > 15% yield. By end of year 2 the variation of critical pillar dimensions should be less than 25%. Light management: high light absorption in the spectral range of the sun has been to be demonstrated for the micropillar forests. By the end of year 1 we will employ FDTD simulation techniques to demonstrate that pillar forests with fill ratios <20% can achieve 99% light absorption. By end of year 2 our original goal was to demonstrate >85% absorption. By end of year 3 > 90% absorption should be demonstrated. Pillar based solar cells: devices will be studied to explore ways to achieve high open-circuit voltages which will lead to high efficiency micropillar-based solar cells. We will start on single pillar devices and the findings in these studies should pave the way for devices based on forests/ arrays of pillars. By the end of the second year we aim to demonstrate a single pillar device with an open-circuit voltage of 0.7 V, as well as a pillar-forest based device with 8% conversion efficiency. By the end of year 3 these numbers should be improved to 0.9 V open-circuit voltage for single pillar devices and >15% efficiency for forest/array-based devices. We will aim to realize a device with 20% efficiency by the end of the project period.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}