skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells

Abstract

As a result of the work within this project manufacturing ready devices were developed using 4 different promising Si material technologies with final efficiencies between 20.1% and 21.2%. The starting efficiencies for the FPACE I project were based on best manufactured p-type and n-type cells at the start of the project in 2011. Target efficiencies proposed for the project were 21% for p-type CZ, 20% for p-type cast Si, 21% for n-type and 20% for epi. All Target efficiencies were met or exceeded by the end of the project in 2014. The figure below list displays the 4 highest performing structures for each material with corresponding achieved efficiencies.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1178574
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005318
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Rohatgi, Ajeet, and Zimbardi, Francesco. Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Rohatgi, Ajeet, & Zimbardi, Francesco. Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells. United States.
Rohatgi, Ajeet, and Zimbardi, Francesco. Fri . "Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1178574,
title = {Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells},
author = {Rohatgi, Ajeet and Zimbardi, Francesco},
abstractNote = {As a result of the work within this project manufacturing ready devices were developed using 4 different promising Si material technologies with final efficiencies between 20.1% and 21.2%. The starting efficiencies for the FPACE I project were based on best manufactured p-type and n-type cells at the start of the project in 2011. Target efficiencies proposed for the project were 21% for p-type CZ, 20% for p-type cast Si, 21% for n-type and 20% for epi. All Target efficiencies were met or exceeded by the end of the project in 2014. The figure below list displays the 4 highest performing structures for each material with corresponding achieved efficiencies.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Fri Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.
  • Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink highmore » efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.« less
  • Colorado State’s F-PACE project explored several ways to increase the efficiency of CdTe solar cells and to better understand the device physics of those cells under study. Increases in voltage, current, and fill factor resulted in efficiencies above 17%. The three project tasks and additional studies are described in detail in the final report. Most cells studied were fabricated at Colorado State using an industry-compatible single-vacuum closed-space-sublimation (CSS) chamber for deposition of the key semiconductor layers. Additionally, some cells were supplied by First Solar for comparison purposes, and a small number of modules were supplied by Abound Solar.
  • Significant achievements are described. The first is the successful deposition of mirror-like, single phase, epitaxial ZnSiAs/sub 2/ layers on 100 Ge substrates using the organometallic growth approach. Secondly, the quality of the first layers have already exceeded that of the material grown with the original growth system. Carrier concentrations (holes) are approximately one order of magnitude lower. Thirdly, amorphous (glassy) deposits of zinc silicon arsenide, which heretofore have not been reported, have been grown. Both p- and n-type conductivites have been observed. Finally, several p-ZnSiAs/sub 2//n-GaAs structures have been grown which exhibit photovoltaic behavior. AMO conversion efficiencies of 1 tomore » 3% have been measured.« less