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Title: Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1177556
Report Number(s):
ANL/APS/TB-44, Rev. 5
110410
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fernandez, P., and Davey, S. Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1177556.
Fernandez, P., & Davey, S. Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source. United States. doi:10.2172/1177556.
Fernandez, P., and Davey, S. Mon . "Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source". United States. doi:10.2172/1177556. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1177556.
@article{osti_1177556,
title = {Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source},
author = {Fernandez, P. and Davey, S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.2172/1177556},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Shielding for the APS will be such that the individual radiation worker dose will be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The ALARA goals for the APS are to keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 500 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS radiation worker, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one employee as far below 200 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The ALARA goal for APS beamline scientists is tomore » keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 100 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS beamline scientist, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one scientist as far below 50 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The dose is actively monitored by the radiation monitors on the storage ring wall in each sector and by the frequent area surveys performed by the health physics personnel. For cases in which surveys indicate elevated hourly dose rates that may impact worker exposure, additional local shielding is provided to reduce the radiation field to an acceptable level. Passive area monitors are used throughout the facility to integrate doses in various areas. The results are analyzed for trends of increased doses, and shielding in these areas is evaluated and improved, as appropriate. The APS policy for on-site nonradiation workers in the vicinity of the APS facilities requires that the average nonradiation worker dose be below 0.2 mSv/yr (20 mrem/yr). In addition, the dose at the site boundary from all pathways is required to be below 0.1 mSv/yr (10 mrem/yr). For future modifications of the facility, the doses shall be evaluated and additional shielding provided to meet the policy requirements.« less
  • The report summarizes the radiation shielding recommendations for APS beamlines and Front-ends.
  • Shielding for the APS will be such that the individual worker dose will be ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) and less than 5 mSv/yr (500 mrem/yr). The APS shielding policy requires that the average worker dose be below 2 mSv/yr (200 mrem/yr). Worker dose is monitored, and frequent area-surveys are performed by health physics personnel. For cases in which surveys indicate elevated hourly dose rates that may impact worker exposure, additional local shielding is provided to reduce the radiation field to an acceptable level. Passive monitors are used throughout the facility to integrate doses in various areas. The resultsmore » are analyzed for trends of increased doses, and shielding in these areas is evaluated and improved, as appropriate.« less
  • Explosive bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bonding between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. Since 1991, a number of explosive-bonding joints have been designed for high-thermal-load ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) compatible components in the Advanced Photon Source. A series of standardized explosive bonded joint units has also been designed and tested, such as: oxygen-free copper (OFHC) to stainless-steel vacuum joints for slits and shutters, GlidCop to stainless-steel vacuum joints for fixed masks, and GlidCop to OFHC thermal and mechanical joints for shutter face-plates, etc. The designmore » and test results for the explosive bonding units to be used in the Advanced Photon Source front ends and beamlines will be discussed in this paper.« less