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Title: CREATING A NATIONWIDE URBAN FOOTPRINT DATASET USING POPULATION DENSITY

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1177161
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-06-1763
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS ANNUAL MEETING ; 200603 ; CHICAGO
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; NISAC

Citation Formats

RUSH, JONATHAN F., and MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N. CREATING A NATIONWIDE URBAN FOOTPRINT DATASET USING POPULATION DENSITY. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
RUSH, JONATHAN F., & MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N. CREATING A NATIONWIDE URBAN FOOTPRINT DATASET USING POPULATION DENSITY. United States.
RUSH, JONATHAN F., and MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N. Thu . "CREATING A NATIONWIDE URBAN FOOTPRINT DATASET USING POPULATION DENSITY". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1177161.
@article{osti_1177161,
title = {CREATING A NATIONWIDE URBAN FOOTPRINT DATASET USING POPULATION DENSITY},
author = {RUSH, JONATHAN F. and MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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