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Title: A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities

Abstract

There are two basic types of solar energy technology: photovoltaic and concentrating solar power. As the number of utility-scale solar energy facilities using these technologies is expected to increase in the United States, so are the potential impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Recent attention is on the risk of fatality to birds. Understanding the current rates of avian mortality and existing monitoring requirements is an important first step in developing science-based mitigation and minimization protocols. The resulting information also allows a comparison of the avian mortality rates of utility-scale solar energy facilities with those from other technologies and sources, as well as the identification of data gaps and research needs. This report will present and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding avian issues at utility-scale solar energy facilities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1176921
Report Number(s):
ANL/EVS-15/2
113903
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; MITIGATION; MONITORING; MORTALITY; SOLAR ENERGY; Avian; Avian Fatality; Avian Mortality; Ecological Impacts; Fatality; Mitigation; Monitoring; Mortality; Solar; Solar Energy

Citation Formats

Walston, Leroy J., Rollins, Katherine E., Smith, Karen P., LaGory, Kirk E., Sinclair, Karin, Turchi, Craig, Wendelin, Tim, and Souder, Heidi. A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1176921.
Walston, Leroy J., Rollins, Katherine E., Smith, Karen P., LaGory, Kirk E., Sinclair, Karin, Turchi, Craig, Wendelin, Tim, & Souder, Heidi. A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities. United States. doi:10.2172/1176921.
Walston, Leroy J., Rollins, Katherine E., Smith, Karen P., LaGory, Kirk E., Sinclair, Karin, Turchi, Craig, Wendelin, Tim, and Souder, Heidi. 2015. "A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities". United States. doi:10.2172/1176921. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1176921.
@article{osti_1176921,
title = {A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities},
author = {Walston, Leroy J. and Rollins, Katherine E. and Smith, Karen P. and LaGory, Kirk E. and Sinclair, Karin and Turchi, Craig and Wendelin, Tim and Souder, Heidi},
abstractNote = {There are two basic types of solar energy technology: photovoltaic and concentrating solar power. As the number of utility-scale solar energy facilities using these technologies is expected to increase in the United States, so are the potential impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Recent attention is on the risk of fatality to birds. Understanding the current rates of avian mortality and existing monitoring requirements is an important first step in developing science-based mitigation and minimization protocols. The resulting information also allows a comparison of the avian mortality rates of utility-scale solar energy facilities with those from other technologies and sources, as well as the identification of data gaps and research needs. This report will present and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding avian issues at utility-scale solar energy facilities.},
doi = {10.2172/1176921},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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