skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

Abstract

A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

Inventors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1176089
Patent Number(s):
7,169,290
Application Number:
10/937,220
Assignee:
Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (Idaho Falls, ID) INL
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-99ID13727
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Aiken, Abigail M., Peyton, Brent M., Apel, William A., and Petersen, James N. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Aiken, Abigail M., Peyton, Brent M., Apel, William A., & Petersen, James N. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation. United States.
Aiken, Abigail M., Peyton, Brent M., Apel, William A., and Petersen, James N. 2007. "Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1176089.
@article{osti_1176089,
title = {Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation},
author = {Aiken, Abigail M. and Peyton, Brent M. and Apel, William A. and Petersen, James N.},
abstractNote = {A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}

Patent:

Save / Share:
  • The present invention relates to chemical sensor and biosensor probes for measuring low concentration of metals and metal ions in complex samples such as biological fluids, living cells, and environmental samples. More particularly the present invention relates to a gel-based Indo-1 and Fura-2 chemical sensor probes for the measurement of low concentrations of calcium, cadmium, magnesium and the like. Also disclosed is a detector device using the sensors of the present invention.
  • Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.
  • A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins includes the steps of providing a fluid to be analyzed having a plurality of photosynthetic organisms therein, wherein chemical, biological or radiological agents alter a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. At a first time a measured photosynthetic activity curve is obtained from the photosynthetic organisms. The measured curve is automatically compared to a reference photosynthetic activity curve to determine differences therebetween. The presence of the chemical, biological or radiological agents, or precursors thereof, are then identified if present in the fluid using the differences.
  • A method of detecting a metal in a sample comprising a plurality of metal is disclosed. The method comprises providing the sample comprising a metal to be detected. The sample is added to a reagent solution comprising an enzyme and a substrate, where the enzyme is inhibited by the metal to be detected. An array of chelating agents is used to eliminate the inhibitory effects of additional metals in the sample. An enzymatic activity in the sample is determined and compared to an enzymatic activity in a control solution to detect the metal to be detected. A method of determiningmore » a concentration of the metal in the sample is also disclosed. A method of detecting a valence state of a metal is also disclosed.« less
  • Currently, regulations regarding the maximum permitted concentrations of metals in soils are based on measurements of the total concentration. However, a range of chemical and biological techniques are being developed to predict the bioavailable component of these pollutants. A lux-based biosensor was tested in soil solutions extracted from two field experiments at Braunschweig, Germany, that had the same metal inputs, but differed in pH. The bioluminescence response was found to decline as the free Zn{sup 2+} increased, and both soils fitted the same relationship with soil solution metal concentrations. The EC25 and EC50 derived from this curve were 1.9 andmore » 6.1 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, the response to total Zn concentrations in the bulk soil showed distinct curves for each soil, further highlighting the appropriateness of free Zn{sup 2+} as a toxicity indicator. Other metals were present in the soil, but were unlikely to be toxic, because the observed concentrations were less than their individual toxic threshold values in solution. Bioluminescence-based biosensors were concluded to possibly offer an inexpensive and rapid technique to evaluate the bioavailability of metals in soil systems. The response of these biosensors can be related to soil solution speciation measurements, and this gives a common basis for expression of toxic thresholds in different soils.« less