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Title: Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

Abstract

A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Inventors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1175631
Patent Number(s):
6,989,252
Application Number:
09/748,690
Assignee:
Midwest Research Institute (Kansas City, MO) OSTI
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99GO10337
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Melis, Anastasios, Zhang, Liping, Benemann, John R., Forestier, Marc, Ghirardi, Maria, and Seibert, Michael. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Melis, Anastasios, Zhang, Liping, Benemann, John R., Forestier, Marc, Ghirardi, Maria, & Seibert, Michael. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. United States.
Melis, Anastasios, Zhang, Liping, Benemann, John R., Forestier, Marc, Ghirardi, Maria, and Seibert, Michael. 2006. "Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1175631.
@article{osti_1175631,
title = {Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms},
author = {Melis, Anastasios and Zhang, Liping and Benemann, John R. and Forestier, Marc and Ghirardi, Maria and Seibert, Michael},
abstractNote = {A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 1
}

Patent:

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  • A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gasmore » production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.« less
  • The photobiological production of H{sub 2} gas, using water as the only electron donor, is a property of two types of photosynthetic microorganisms: green algae and cyanobacteria. In these organisms, photosynthetic water splitting is functionally linked to H{sub 2} production by the activity of hydrogenase enzymes. Interestingly, each of these organisms contains only one of two major types of hydrogenases, [FeFe] or [NiFe] enzymes, which are phylogenetically distinct but perform the same catalytic reaction, suggesting convergent evolution. This idea is supported by the observation that each of the two classes of hydrogenases has a different metallo-cluster, is encoded by entirelymore » different sets of genes (apparently under the control of different promoter elements), and exhibits different maturation pathways. The genetics, biosynthesis, structure, function, and O{sub 2} sensitivity of these enzymes have been the focus of extensive research in recent years. Some of this effort is clearly driven by the potential for using these enzymes in future biological or biohybrid systems to produce renewable fuel or in fuel cell applications.« less
  • The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. Themore » photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.« less