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Title: Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

Abstract

A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1175616
Patent Number(s):
6,984,768
Application Number:
10/152,599
Assignee:
Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (Idaho Falls, ID)
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-99ID13727
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Ginosar, Daniel M., Fox, Robert V., and Janikowski, Stuart K.. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Ginosar, Daniel M., Fox, Robert V., & Janikowski, Stuart K.. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent. United States.
Ginosar, Daniel M., Fox, Robert V., and Janikowski, Stuart K.. 2006. "Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1175616.
@article{osti_1175616,
title = {Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent},
author = {Ginosar, Daniel M. and Fox, Robert V. and Janikowski, Stuart K.},
abstractNote = {A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1175616}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {1}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Catalytic dechlorination of 1-chlorooctadecane in supercritical carbon dioxide
journal, August 2001


Reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyl compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide
journal, January 2000


Dechlorination of 1-chlorohexadecane and 2-chloronaphthalene in water under sub- and supercritical conditions
journal, December 2000


Dechlorination of PCBs with Supercritical Water Hydrolysis.
journal, January 1999


Analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated terphenyls via carbon skeleton gas-liquid chromatography
journal, September 1978


Solubility of individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in supercritical fluids: CO2, CO2/MeOH and CO2/n-C4H10
journal, March 1999