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Title: Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

Abstract

Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Affymetrix, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1175233
Patent Number(s):
6,852,488
Application Number:
09/776,768
Assignee:
Affymetrix, Inc. (Santa Clara, CA) OSTI
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-92ER81275
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Fodor, Stephen P. A., Lipshutz, Robert J., and Huang, Xiaohua. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Fodor, Stephen P. A., Lipshutz, Robert J., & Huang, Xiaohua. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid. United States.
Fodor, Stephen P. A., Lipshutz, Robert J., and Huang, Xiaohua. 2005. "Identifying a base in a nucleic acid". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1175233.
@article{osti_1175233,
title = {Identifying a base in a nucleic acid},
author = {Fodor, Stephen P. A. and Lipshutz, Robert J. and Huang, Xiaohua},
abstractNote = {Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 2
}

Patent:

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  • Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.
  • Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.
  • This invention relates to devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.
  • A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.
  • A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to themore » second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.« less