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Title: CONCLUDING A STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION PROJECT AT A DNAPL SOURCE ZONE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1174129
Report Number(s):
SRNS-STI-2014-00347
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual Waste Management Symposia International Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kramer, B. CONCLUDING A STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION PROJECT AT A DNAPL SOURCE ZONE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Kramer, B. CONCLUDING A STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION PROJECT AT A DNAPL SOURCE ZONE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE. United States.
Kramer, B. Mon . "CONCLUDING A STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION PROJECT AT A DNAPL SOURCE ZONE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1174129.
@article{osti_1174129,
title = {CONCLUDING A STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION PROJECT AT A DNAPL SOURCE ZONE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE},
author = {Kramer, B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Aug 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
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  • This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006more » to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing plan as well as facility processing rates. These lessons learned, challenges, and improvements will be discussed to aid other sites in their efforts to conduct similar activities.« less
  • This report summarizes historical A/M-Area DNAPL activities and data, and presents the overall A/M-Area strategy flowchart, the status work for each DNAPL source zone (or potential source zone), and future A/M-Area DNAPL plans.
  • In March of 2003, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) completed a full-scale nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) remediation of Area A of the Northeast Site at the Young-Rainey STAR Center, Largo, Florida. The site was contaminated with approximately 2,300 kg (5,000 lbs) of NAPL constituents such as TCE, cis-1,2-DCE, methylene chloride, toluene, and petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was remediated by SteamTech using a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and electrical resistance heating during operations lasting 4.5 months. After the target volume had been heated to or near boiling temperatures, pressure cycles were used to increase the mass removal rates. Each de-pressurizationmore » cycle led to large increases in the vapor phase recovery, until a final phase of diminishing returns was reached. Post-operational sampling at randomly selected locations showed the concentrations of all contaminants of concern (COC) to be well below the remedial goals. The majority of the groundwater samples were below maximum contaminant level (MCL) for all the contaminants of concern. The overall mass balance showed that about 0.5 kg (1 pound) of VOCs remained in the remedial volume, and showed remedial efficiencies of between 99.85 and 99.99 percent for the four chemicals of concern. This is the first full-scale demonstration of complete source removal at a DNAPL site. Since the post-operational sampling shows all concentrations to be below or close to groundwater MCLs, the thermal remedy may be satisfactory for site closure without a polishing phase.« less
  • Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment ofmore » Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)« less