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Title: National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.

Abstract

Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network via the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. An initial set of thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define a standardized interchange format: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, earthquake hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature descriptions data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal properties, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed preferentially from existing community use in order tomore » encourage widespread adoption and promulgate minimum metadata quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other NGDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (USGS, Southern Methodist University, Boise State University Geothermal Data Coalition) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive, holistic set of data critical to geothermal energy development. As of September 2011, we have over 34,000 records registered in the system catalog, and 234,942 data resources online, along with scores of Web services to deliver integrated data to the desktop for free downloading or online use. The data exchange mechanism is built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN, http://usgin.org and http://lab.usgin.org) protocols and standards developed as a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
  1. Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1172341
Report Number(s):
DOE-AZGS-2850-3
DOE Contract Number:
EE0002850
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. Stanford University, Stanford California, January 30-February 1, 2012
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; data sharing, digitized data network, geothermal resources, cyberinfrastructure, National Geothermal Data System, Allison, Richard, Patten

Citation Formats

Allison, Lee, Richard, Stephen, Clark, Ryan, Patten, Kim, Love, Diane, Coleman, Celia, Chen, Genhan, Matti, Jordan, Pape, Estelle, and Musil, Leah. National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Allison, Lee, Richard, Stephen, Clark, Ryan, Patten, Kim, Love, Diane, Coleman, Celia, Chen, Genhan, Matti, Jordan, Pape, Estelle, & Musil, Leah. National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.. United States.
Allison, Lee, Richard, Stephen, Clark, Ryan, Patten, Kim, Love, Diane, Coleman, Celia, Chen, Genhan, Matti, Jordan, Pape, Estelle, and Musil, Leah. 2012. "National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1172341.
@article{osti_1172341,
title = {National Geothermal Data System: Interactive Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential in the U.S.},
author = {Allison, Lee and Richard, Stephen and Clark, Ryan and Patten, Kim and Love, Diane and Coleman, Celia and Chen, Genhan and Matti, Jordan and Pape, Estelle and Musil, Leah},
abstractNote = {Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network via the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. An initial set of thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define a standardized interchange format: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, earthquake hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature descriptions data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal properties, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed preferentially from existing community use in order to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate minimum metadata quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other NGDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (USGS, Southern Methodist University, Boise State University Geothermal Data Coalition) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive, holistic set of data critical to geothermal energy development. As of September 2011, we have over 34,000 records registered in the system catalog, and 234,942 data resources online, along with scores of Web services to deliver integrated data to the desktop for free downloading or online use. The data exchange mechanism is built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN, http://usgin.org and http://lab.usgin.org) protocols and standards developed as a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 1
}

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  • To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to ad- vance geothermal energy as a viable renewable ener- gy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is in- vesting in the development of the National Geother- mal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to sup- ply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are dis- cussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geother- mal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by allmore » geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS in- cludes a work plan that addresses data assets and re- sources of interest to users, a survey of data provid- ers, data content models, and how data will be ex- changed and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.« less
  • The NGDS released version 1 of the system on April 30, 2014 using the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) as its data integration platform. NGDS supports the 2013 Open Data Policy, and as such, the launch was featured at the 2014 Energy Datapalooza. Currently, the NGDS features a comprehensive user interface for searching and accessing nearly 41,000 documents and more than 9 million data points shared by scores of data providers across the U.S. The NGDS supports distributed data sharing, permitting the data owners to maintain the raw data that is made available to the consumer. Researchers and industry havemore » been utilizing the NGDS as a mechanism for promoting geothermal development across the country, from hydrothermal to ground source heat pump applications. Case studies in geothermal research and exploration from across the country are highlighted.« less
  • Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Data System (GDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. A growing set of more than thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define standardized interchangemore » formats for: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, seismic event hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature description data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal characterization, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed based on existing community datasets to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate content quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other GDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, Southern Methodist University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Utah) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive, holistic set of data critical to geothermal energy development. As of May 2012 , we have nearly 37,000 records registered in the system catalog, and 550,075 data resources online, along with hundreds of Web services to deliver integrated data to the desktop for free downloading or online use. The data exchange mechanism is built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN, http://usgin.org and http://lab.usgin.org) protocols and standards developed as a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Keywords Data« less
  • Since the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office has funded $33.7 million for multiple data digitization and aggregation projects focused on making vast amounts of geothermal relevant data available to industry for advancing geothermal exploration. These projects are collectively part of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed, networked system for maintaining, sharing, and accessing data in an effort to lower the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Determining “who owns” and “who maintains” the NGDS and its data nodes (repositories in the distributed system) is yet to be determined. However, themore » invest- ment in building and populating the NGDS has been substantial, both in terms of dollars and time; it is critical that this investment be protected by ensuring sustainability of the data, the software and systems, and the accessibility of the data. Only then, will the benefits be fully realized. To keep this operational system sustainable will require four core elements: continued serving of data and applications; maintenance of system operations; a governance structure; and an effective business model. Each of these presents a number of challenges. Data being added to the NGDS are not strictly geothermal but data considered relevant to geothermal exploration and develop- ment, including vast amounts of oil and gas and groundwater wells, among other data. These are relevant to a broader base of users. By diversifying the client base to other users and other fields, the cost of maintaining core infrastructure can be spread across an array of stakeholders and clients. It is presumed that NGDS will continue to provide free and open access to its data resources. The next-phase NGDS operation should be structured to eventually pursue revenue streams to help off-set sustainability expenses as necessary and appropriate, potentially including income from: grants and contracts (agencies, foundations, pri- vate sector), membership, fees for services (consulting, training, customization, ‘app’ development), repository services (data, services, apps, models, documents, multimedia), advertisements, fees for premier services or applications, subscriptions to value added services, licenses, contributions and donations, endow- ments, and sponsorships.« less