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Title: Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

Abstract

Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines have the potential to achieve high fuel efficiency and to significantly reduce both NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions by operating under dilute partially-premixed conditions. This low temperature combustion strategy is dependent upon direct-injection of gasoline during the compression stroke and potentially near top dead center (TDC). The timing and duration of the in-cylinder injections can be tailored based on speed and load to create optimized conditions that result in a stable combustion. We present the results of advanced aerosol analysis methods that have been used for detailed real-time characterization of PM emitted from a single-cylinder GCI engine operated at different speed, load, timing, and number and duration of near-TDC fuel injections. PM characterization included 28 measurements of size and composition of individual particles sampled directly from the exhaust and after mass and/or mobility classification. We use these data to calculate particle effective density, fractal dimension, dynamic shape factors in free-molecular and transition flow regimes, average diameter of primary spherules, number of spherules, and void fraction of soot agglomerates.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1171312
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-98103
40063; 48410; KC0302020; VT0401000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Combustion and Flame, 161(8):2151-2164
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Zelenyuk, Alla, Reitz, Paul, Stewart, Mark L., Imre, D., Loeper, Paul, Adams, Cory, Andrie, Michael, Rothamer, David, Foster, David E., Narayanaswamy, Kushal, Najt, Paul M., and Solomon, Arun S.. Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.011.
Zelenyuk, Alla, Reitz, Paul, Stewart, Mark L., Imre, D., Loeper, Paul, Adams, Cory, Andrie, Michael, Rothamer, David, Foster, David E., Narayanaswamy, Kushal, Najt, Paul M., & Solomon, Arun S.. Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine. United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.011.
Zelenyuk, Alla, Reitz, Paul, Stewart, Mark L., Imre, D., Loeper, Paul, Adams, Cory, Andrie, Michael, Rothamer, David, Foster, David E., Narayanaswamy, Kushal, Najt, Paul M., and Solomon, Arun S.. Fri . "Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine". United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.011.
@article{osti_1171312,
title = {Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine},
author = {Zelenyuk, Alla and Reitz, Paul and Stewart, Mark L. and Imre, D. and Loeper, Paul and Adams, Cory and Andrie, Michael and Rothamer, David and Foster, David E. and Narayanaswamy, Kushal and Najt, Paul M. and Solomon, Arun S.},
abstractNote = {Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines have the potential to achieve high fuel efficiency and to significantly reduce both NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions by operating under dilute partially-premixed conditions. This low temperature combustion strategy is dependent upon direct-injection of gasoline during the compression stroke and potentially near top dead center (TDC). The timing and duration of the in-cylinder injections can be tailored based on speed and load to create optimized conditions that result in a stable combustion. We present the results of advanced aerosol analysis methods that have been used for detailed real-time characterization of PM emitted from a single-cylinder GCI engine operated at different speed, load, timing, and number and duration of near-TDC fuel injections. PM characterization included 28 measurements of size and composition of individual particles sampled directly from the exhaust and after mass and/or mobility classification. We use these data to calculate particle effective density, fractal dimension, dynamic shape factors in free-molecular and transition flow regimes, average diameter of primary spherules, number of spherules, and void fraction of soot agglomerates.},
doi = {10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.011},
journal = {Combustion and Flame, 161(8):2151-2164},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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