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Title: Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries

Abstract

Extended cycling of the Li-O2 battery under full discharge/charge conditions is achievable upon selection of appropriate electrode materials and cycling protocol. However, the decomposition of the side products also contribute to the observed good cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries. Quantitative analyses of the discharge and charge products reveals a quick switch from the predominant formation of Li2O2 to the predominant formation of side products during the first a few cycles of the Li-O2 batteries. After the switch, cycling stabilizes with a repeatable formation of Li2O2/side products at ~1:2 ratio. CNTs/Ru composite electrodes exhibits lower charge voltage and deliver 50 full discharge-charge cycles without sharp capacity drop. Ru coated glass carbon electrode can lead to more than 500 cycles without change in its cycling profiles. The better understanding on Li-O2 reaction processes developed in this work may lead to the further improvement on the long term cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1171296
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-99830
43997; 30490; 47714; VT1201000; KC0208010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 6(16):14141-14151
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Li-O2 battery; Li2O2; oxygen reduction; oxygen evolution; ruthenium; rechargeability; carbon nanotubes; cyclability; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Nasybulin, Eduard N., Xu, Wu, Mehdi, Beata L., Thomsen, Edwin C., Engelhard, Mark H., Masse, Robert C., Bhattacharya, Priyanka, Gu, Meng, Bennett, Wendy D., Nie, Zimin, Wang, Chong M., Browning, Nigel D., and Zhang, Jiguang. Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/am503390q.
Nasybulin, Eduard N., Xu, Wu, Mehdi, Beata L., Thomsen, Edwin C., Engelhard, Mark H., Masse, Robert C., Bhattacharya, Priyanka, Gu, Meng, Bennett, Wendy D., Nie, Zimin, Wang, Chong M., Browning, Nigel D., & Zhang, Jiguang. Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries. United States. doi:10.1021/am503390q.
Nasybulin, Eduard N., Xu, Wu, Mehdi, Beata L., Thomsen, Edwin C., Engelhard, Mark H., Masse, Robert C., Bhattacharya, Priyanka, Gu, Meng, Bennett, Wendy D., Nie, Zimin, Wang, Chong M., Browning, Nigel D., and Zhang, Jiguang. Wed . "Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries". United States. doi:10.1021/am503390q.
@article{osti_1171296,
title = {Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li-O-2 Batteries},
author = {Nasybulin, Eduard N. and Xu, Wu and Mehdi, Beata L. and Thomsen, Edwin C. and Engelhard, Mark H. and Masse, Robert C. and Bhattacharya, Priyanka and Gu, Meng and Bennett, Wendy D. and Nie, Zimin and Wang, Chong M. and Browning, Nigel D. and Zhang, Jiguang},
abstractNote = {Extended cycling of the Li-O2 battery under full discharge/charge conditions is achievable upon selection of appropriate electrode materials and cycling protocol. However, the decomposition of the side products also contribute to the observed good cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries. Quantitative analyses of the discharge and charge products reveals a quick switch from the predominant formation of Li2O2 to the predominant formation of side products during the first a few cycles of the Li-O2 batteries. After the switch, cycling stabilizes with a repeatable formation of Li2O2/side products at ~1:2 ratio. CNTs/Ru composite electrodes exhibits lower charge voltage and deliver 50 full discharge-charge cycles without sharp capacity drop. Ru coated glass carbon electrode can lead to more than 500 cycles without change in its cycling profiles. The better understanding on Li-O2 reaction processes developed in this work may lead to the further improvement on the long term cycling behavior of high capacity Li-O2 batteries.},
doi = {10.1021/am503390q},
journal = {ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 6(16):14141-14151},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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