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Title: Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

Abstract

Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising undermore » naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in Δ-3-carene.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1171287
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-102964
Journal ID: ISSN 0029-8549
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oecologia; Journal Volume: 176; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Harley, Peter, Eller, Allyson, Guenther, Alex, and Monson, Russell K. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1007/s00442-014-3008-5.
Harley, Peter, Eller, Allyson, Guenther, Alex, & Monson, Russell K. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance. United States. doi:10.1007/s00442-014-3008-5.
Harley, Peter, Eller, Allyson, Guenther, Alex, and Monson, Russell K. Sat . "Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance". United States. doi:10.1007/s00442-014-3008-5.
@article{osti_1171287,
title = {Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance},
author = {Harley, Peter and Eller, Allyson and Guenther, Alex and Monson, Russell K.},
abstractNote = {Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in Δ-3-carene.},
doi = {10.1007/s00442-014-3008-5},
journal = {Oecologia},
number = 1,
volume = 176,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 12 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sat Jul 12 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • The seasonal course (May to October 1977) of gross photosynthesis (from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake and stomatal conductance) in a stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) in the San Bernardino National Forest was characterized as a function of light. Nine sapling trees, classified for comparative studies into three chronic injury classes (slight, moderate, severe) had experienced oxidant fumigations from California's South Coast Air Basin for approximately 18 years, since their establishment following fire. The CO/sub 2/-transfer pathway was partitioned into its stomatal and residual (mesophyll, carboxylation, excitation) resistance components, for conditions of light saturation and 20/sup 0/C. Light-saturated grossmore » photosynthetic rates and photochemical conversion efficiencies were highest in the current-year needles and decreased with increasing needle age and oxidant injury. Maximum stomatal conductance and stomatal sensitivity to increasing light during stomatal opening followed a trend similar to that of photosynthesis, except for current-year needles, where conductance parameters were highest in the severely injured trees. This higher conductance may contribute to observed differential ozone sensitivity in ponderosa pine. Premature senesence and abscission of the 1-year (severely injured trees) and 2-year (slight to moderate injury) needles occurred at about the time CO/sub 2/ uptake dropped to 10 percent of the potential for current needles of slightly injured trees without foliar injury symptoms. The ratio of the stomatal CO/sub 2/ resistance to the total CO/sub 2/ resistance decreased with increasing oxidant injury and needle age, suggesting that loss of photosynthetic capacity was primarily related to the loss of chloroplast function rather than to increased resistance of CO/sub 2/ diffusion through the stomata.« less
  • The seasonal course (May to October 1977) of gross photosynthesis (from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake and stomatal conductance) in a stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) in the San Bernardino National Forest was characterized as a function of light. Nine sapling trees, classified for comparative studies into three chronic injury classes (slight, moderate, severe) had experienced oxidant fumigations from California's South Coast Air Basin for approximately 18 years, since their establishment following fire. The CO/sub 2/-transfer pathway was partitioned into its stomatal and residual (mesophyll, carboxylation, excitation) resistance components, for conditions of light saturation and 20/sup 0/C. Light-saturated grossmore » photosynthetic rates and photochemical conversion efficiencies were highest in the current-year needles and decreased with increasing needle age and oxidant injury. Maximum stomatal conductance and stomatal sensitivity to increasing light during stomatal opening followed a trend similar to that of photosynthesis, except for current-year needles, where conductance parameters were highest in the severely injured trees. This higher conductance may contribute to observed differential ozone sensitivity in ponderosa pine. Premature senesence and abscission of the 1-year (severely injured trees) and 2-year (slight to moderate injury) needles occurred at about the time CO/sub 2/ uptake dropped to 10% of the potential for current needles of slightly injured trees without foliar injury symptoms. The ratio of stomatal CO/sub 2/ resistance to the total CO/sub 2/ resistance decreased with increasing oxidant injury and needle age, suggesting that loss of photosynthetic capacity was primarily related to the loss of chloroplast function rather than to increased resistance of CO/sub 2/ diffusion through the stomata.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Visual symptoms and histological effects of SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, and a combination of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ were compared in rapidly elongating needles of sensitive clonal selections of Pinus ponderosa Laws. Both pollutants were administered separately or in combination at 0.45 ppM for 9 hr/day. Visual and histological injury appeared in distal needle portions after exposure to SO/sub 2/ or SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/; but damage was predominately due to SO/sub 2/. Ozone caused an aggregation of cytoplasm and cellular organelles into peripheral areas of plicate parenchyma cells. Ozone injury, which became evident several days after SO/submore » 2/ damage, prevailed mostly on needle sections 10 to 15 mm from the distal tip. Sulfur dioxide caused dissolution of cellular components in virtually all needle cell types (parenchyma, epidermis, hypodermis, resin duct epithelium, and vascular tissues). Injury from SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ is compared with that produced by other abiotic agents in pine in order to outline histological techniques for diagnostic purposes.« less
  • A field experiment determined the reflectance wavebands and indices which corresponded most strongly with photosynthetic capacity in a mixed stand of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (P. elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii). The 5-year-old pines ranged in height from 3 m to 6 m and formed an optically dense canopy. Variation in photosynthetic capacity was amplified by soil application of the photosystem 2 herbicides diuron and bromacil to three of six experimental plots. Field measurements began on 23 August 1994 and continued through 20 December 1994. Canopy reflectance and leaf physiological data were acquired during mid to latemore » morning for the sides of trees that generally received full sunlight. Net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate first regressed significantly with reflectance on 5 October at wavelengths near 700 nm. In the 5 October to 2 December period, assimilation rates approximated photosynthetic capacity.« less