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Title: Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

Abstract

The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1171175
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0010275
DOE Contract Number:
SC0010275
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Zhang, Shiwei. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13). United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1171175.
Zhang, Shiwei. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13). United States. doi:10.2172/1171175.
Zhang, Shiwei. Thu . "Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)". United States. doi:10.2172/1171175. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1171175.
@article{osti_1171175,
title = {Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)},
author = {Zhang, Shiwei},
abstractNote = {The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.},
doi = {10.2172/1171175},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Technical Report:

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