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Title: The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study

Abstract

The energy use of data centers is a topic that has received much attention, given that data centers currently account for 1-2% of global electricity use. However, cloud computing holds great potential to reduce data center energy demand moving forward, due to both large reductions in total servers through consolidation and large increases in facility efficiencies compared to traditional local data centers. However, analyzing the net energy implications of shifts to the cloud can be very difficult, because data center services can affect many different components of society’s economic and energy systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1171159
Report Number(s):
LBNL-6298E
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Masanet, Eric, Shehabi, Arman, Liang, Jiaqi, Ramakrishnan, Lavanya, Ma, XiaoHui, Hendrix, Valerie, Walker, Benjamin, and Mantha, Pradeep. The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1171159.
Masanet, Eric, Shehabi, Arman, Liang, Jiaqi, Ramakrishnan, Lavanya, Ma, XiaoHui, Hendrix, Valerie, Walker, Benjamin, & Mantha, Pradeep. The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study. United States. doi:10.2172/1171159.
Masanet, Eric, Shehabi, Arman, Liang, Jiaqi, Ramakrishnan, Lavanya, Ma, XiaoHui, Hendrix, Valerie, Walker, Benjamin, and Mantha, Pradeep. Mon . "The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study". United States. doi:10.2172/1171159. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1171159.
@article{osti_1171159,
title = {The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study},
author = {Masanet, Eric and Shehabi, Arman and Liang, Jiaqi and Ramakrishnan, Lavanya and Ma, XiaoHui and Hendrix, Valerie and Walker, Benjamin and Mantha, Pradeep},
abstractNote = {The energy use of data centers is a topic that has received much attention, given that data centers currently account for 1-2% of global electricity use. However, cloud computing holds great potential to reduce data center energy demand moving forward, due to both large reductions in total servers through consolidation and large increases in facility efficiencies compared to traditional local data centers. However, analyzing the net energy implications of shifts to the cloud can be very difficult, because data center services can affect many different components of society’s economic and energy systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1171159},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 03 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jun 03 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Technical Report:

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