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Title: The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

Abstract

This is the final report for the DoE BES contract DE-FG02-07ER46272. This grant began under a title that gives its history in a few words: The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser. At the time of adopting this name, the UCLA Particle Beam Physics Laboratory (PBPL) was at the forefront of the first demonstrations of SASE FEL, giving the experimental basis for the 4th generation X-ray light source now exemplified by the LCLS, a remarkable generation of machines that have revolutionize nanoscale and ultrafast science. The grant title indicates that physical aspects of the FEL are of interest, and implies that progress requires comprehensive investigations. These aspects include: the physics and technology of high brightness electron beam generation, phase space manipulations, advanced beam diagnostics, state-of-the-art undulators, studies of FEL mode characteristics, as well as the introduction of new theoretical models and start-to-end simulations, all yielding a deep understanding of the SASE FEL. The latest period (2010-13) of BES grant support has been the most productive yet for the UCLA PBPL, and the extensive list of accomplishments is illustrative of our central contributions to advanced FEL research. We give a concise overview here and review ourmore » research results in further detail below. In FEL and ultrafast beam physics, we have experimentally investigated: production of helical beams and FEL modes with orbital angular momentum; chirp-taper single-spike FEL gain; new FROG techniques optimized for FEL, introduced coherent imaging of beam profiles using transition radiation; and demonstrated a next generation cryoundulator. We have performed deep theoretical studies of these phenomena and other advanced FEL physics concepts, such as the space-charge amplifier. In high brightness beams, we have: introduced a new class of hybrid photoinjector for <100 fs beam production; developed new approaches to self-shaped ellipsoidal beams; used nonlinear plasma oscillations to create beam pulse trains; tested new plasmonic, high quantum efficiency cathodes, and developed new methods of beam measurement with um spatial/sub-fs temporal resolution. In ultrafast imaging, we have: developed advanced electro-optic timing systems, performed the 1st pump-probe study using single shot UED, demonstrated continuously time-resolved UED with RF deflection; made initial use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray sources in application through single-shot inline phase contrast imaging, established single-shot X-ray diffraction, and observed ICS high harmonic generation and redshifting due to nonlinear effects. In 5th generation light source research, we have developed the techniques of narrowband, very high power coherent Cerenkov radiation sources based on dielectric wakefield devices. This work is represented by numerous publications in leading journals: e.g. Nature Physics, Physical Review Letters, Applied Physics Letters. The PBPL program’s influence on the field also extends to organization of the electron beam applications community; we have organized the first international UED workshops and the initial two meetings dedicated to 5th generation light source.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1169439
Report Number(s):
DOEUCLA46272
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER46272
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; free-electron laser; photoinjector; ultra-fast

Citation Formats

Rosenzweig, James. The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1169439.
Rosenzweig, James. The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser. United States. doi:10.2172/1169439.
Rosenzweig, James. Fri . "The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser". United States. doi:10.2172/1169439. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1169439.
@article{osti_1169439,
title = {The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser},
author = {Rosenzweig, James},
abstractNote = {This is the final report for the DoE BES contract DE-FG02-07ER46272. This grant began under a title that gives its history in a few words: The Physics of Gain Mechanisms in a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser. At the time of adopting this name, the UCLA Particle Beam Physics Laboratory (PBPL) was at the forefront of the first demonstrations of SASE FEL, giving the experimental basis for the 4th generation X-ray light source now exemplified by the LCLS, a remarkable generation of machines that have revolutionize nanoscale and ultrafast science. The grant title indicates that physical aspects of the FEL are of interest, and implies that progress requires comprehensive investigations. These aspects include: the physics and technology of high brightness electron beam generation, phase space manipulations, advanced beam diagnostics, state-of-the-art undulators, studies of FEL mode characteristics, as well as the introduction of new theoretical models and start-to-end simulations, all yielding a deep understanding of the SASE FEL. The latest period (2010-13) of BES grant support has been the most productive yet for the UCLA PBPL, and the extensive list of accomplishments is illustrative of our central contributions to advanced FEL research. We give a concise overview here and review our research results in further detail below. In FEL and ultrafast beam physics, we have experimentally investigated: production of helical beams and FEL modes with orbital angular momentum; chirp-taper single-spike FEL gain; new FROG techniques optimized for FEL, introduced coherent imaging of beam profiles using transition radiation; and demonstrated a next generation cryoundulator. We have performed deep theoretical studies of these phenomena and other advanced FEL physics concepts, such as the space-charge amplifier. In high brightness beams, we have: introduced a new class of hybrid photoinjector for <100 fs beam production; developed new approaches to self-shaped ellipsoidal beams; used nonlinear plasma oscillations to create beam pulse trains; tested new plasmonic, high quantum efficiency cathodes, and developed new methods of beam measurement with um spatial/sub-fs temporal resolution. In ultrafast imaging, we have: developed advanced electro-optic timing systems, performed the 1st pump-probe study using single shot UED, demonstrated continuously time-resolved UED with RF deflection; made initial use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray sources in application through single-shot inline phase contrast imaging, established single-shot X-ray diffraction, and observed ICS high harmonic generation and redshifting due to nonlinear effects. In 5th generation light source research, we have developed the techniques of narrowband, very high power coherent Cerenkov radiation sources based on dielectric wakefield devices. This work is represented by numerous publications in leading journals: e.g. Nature Physics, Physical Review Letters, Applied Physics Letters. The PBPL program’s influence on the field also extends to organization of the electron beam applications community; we have organized the first international UED workshops and the initial two meetings dedicated to 5th generation light source.},
doi = {10.2172/1169439},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {1}
}