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Title: The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. (Princeton)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1169369
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta; Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 02, 2015
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah, Mishra, Bhoopesh, Myneni, Satish, Fein, Jeremy B., IIT), and Notre). The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.11.018.
Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah, Mishra, Bhoopesh, Myneni, Satish, Fein, Jeremy B., IIT), & Notre). The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.11.018.
Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah, Mishra, Bhoopesh, Myneni, Satish, Fein, Jeremy B., IIT), and Notre). 2016. "The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.11.018.
@article{osti_1169369,
title = {The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells},
author = {Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah and Mishra, Bhoopesh and Myneni, Satish and Fein, Jeremy B. and IIT) and Notre)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.gca.2014.11.018},
journal = {Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta},
number = 02, 2015,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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