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Title: A Unique cis-3-Hydroxy-l-proline Dehydratase in the Enolase Superfamily

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. (Einstein)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1169362
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Am. Chem. Soc.; Journal Volume: 137; Journal Issue: (4) ; 02, 2015
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Zhang, Xinshuai, Kumar, Ritesh, Vetting, Matthew W., Zhao, Suwen, Jacobson, Matthew P., Almo, Steven C., Gerlt, John A., UCSF), and UIUC). A Unique cis-3-Hydroxy-l-proline Dehydratase in the Enolase Superfamily. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/ja5103986.
Zhang, Xinshuai, Kumar, Ritesh, Vetting, Matthew W., Zhao, Suwen, Jacobson, Matthew P., Almo, Steven C., Gerlt, John A., UCSF), & UIUC). A Unique cis-3-Hydroxy-l-proline Dehydratase in the Enolase Superfamily. United States. doi:10.1021/ja5103986.
Zhang, Xinshuai, Kumar, Ritesh, Vetting, Matthew W., Zhao, Suwen, Jacobson, Matthew P., Almo, Steven C., Gerlt, John A., UCSF), and UIUC). 2016. "A Unique cis-3-Hydroxy-l-proline Dehydratase in the Enolase Superfamily". United States. doi:10.1021/ja5103986.
@article{osti_1169362,
title = {A Unique cis-3-Hydroxy-l-proline Dehydratase in the Enolase Superfamily},
author = {Zhang, Xinshuai and Kumar, Ritesh and Vetting, Matthew W. and Zhao, Suwen and Jacobson, Matthew P. and Almo, Steven C. and Gerlt, John A. and UCSF) and UIUC)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/ja5103986},
journal = {J. Am. Chem. Soc.},
number = (4) ; 02, 2015,
volume = 137,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structuresmore » in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L-galactonate and D-arabinonate in competition with dehydration. The functional promiscuity discovered for FucD highlights possible structural mechanisms for evolution of function in the enolase superfamily.« less
  • We assigned L-talarate dehydratase (TalrD) and galactarate dehydratase (GalrD) functions to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily, focusing our characterization on the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome (GI:16766982; STM3697). Like the homologous mandelate racemase, L-fuconate dehydratase, and D-tartrate dehydratase, the active site of TalrD/GalrD contains a general acid/base Lys 197 at the end of the second {beta}-strand in the ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 7}{beta}-barrel domain, Asp 226, Glu 252, and Glu 278 as ligands for the essential Mg{sup 2+} at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {sup {beta}}-strands, a general acid/base His 328-Aspmore » 301 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, and an electrophilic Glu 348 at the end of the eighth {beta}-strand. We discovered the function of STM3697 by screening a library of acid sugars; it catalyzes the efficient dehydration of both L-talarate (k{sub cat} = 2.1 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 9.1 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and galactarate (k{sub cat} = 3.5 s{sup -1}, k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Because L-talarate is a previously unknown metabolite, we demonstrated that S. typhimurium LT2 can utilize L-talarate as carbon source. Insertional disruption of the gene encoding STM3697 abolishes this phenotype; this disruption also diminishes, but does not eliminate, the ability of the organism to utilize galactarate as carbon source. The dehydration of L-talarate is accompanied by competing epimerization to galactarate; little epimerization to L-talarate is observed in the dehydration of galactarate. On the basis of (1) structures of the wild type enzyme complexed with L-lyxarohydroxamate, an analogue of the enolate intermediate, and of the K197A mutant complexed with L-glucarate, a substrate for exchange of the {alpha}-proton, and (2) incorporation of solvent deuterium into galactarate in competition with dehydration, we conclude that Lys 197 functions as the galactarate-specific base and His 328 functions as the L-talarate-specific base. The epimerization of L-talarate to galactarate that competes with dehydration can be rationalized by partitioning of the enolate intermediate between dehydration (departure of the 3-OH group catalyzed by the conjugate acid of His 328) and epimerization (protonation on C2 by the conjugate acid of Lys 197). The promiscuous catalytic activities discovered for STM3697 highlight the evolutionary potential of a 'conserved' active site architecture.« less
  • We focus on the assignment of function to and elucidation of structure-function relationships for a member of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily encoded by the Bradyrhizobium japonicum genome (bll6730; GI:27381841). As suggested by sequence alignments, the active site contains the same functional groups found in the active site of mandelate racemase (MR) that catalyzes a 1,1-proton transfer reaction: two acid/base catalysts, Lys 184 at the end of the second {beta}-strand, and a His 322-Asp 292 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth -strands, respectively, as well as ligands for an essential Mg{sup 2+}, Asp 213, Glu 239, andmore » Glu 265 at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. We screened a library of 46 acid sugars and discovered that only D-tartrate is dehydrated, yielding oxaloacetate as product. The kinetic constants (k{sub cat} = 7.3 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub M} = 8.5 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) are consistent with assignment of the D-tartrate dehydratase (TarD) function. The kinetic phenotypes of mutants as well as the structures of liganded complexes are consistent with a mechanism in which Lys 184 initiates the reaction by abstraction of the {alpha}-proton to generate a Mg{sup 2+}-stabilized enediolate intermediate, and the vinylogous -elimination of the 3-OH group is general acid-catalyzed by the His 322, accomplishing the anti-elimination of water. The replacement of the leaving group by solvent-derived hydrogen is stereorandom, suggesting that the enol tautomer of oxaloacetate is the product; this expectation was confirmed by its observation by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Thus, the TarD-catalyzed reaction is a 'simple' extension of the two-step reaction catalyzed by MR: base-catalyzed proton abstraction to generate a Mg{sup 2+}-stabilized enediolate intermediate followed by acid-catalyzed decomposition of that intermediate to yield the product.« less
  • The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonatemore » (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and delivers a proton to carbon-3 to replace the 3-OH group with retention of configuration.« less
  • The structure of an uncharacterized member of the enolase superfamily from Oceanobacillus iheyensis (GI 23100298, IMG locus tag Ob2843, PDB entry 2OQY) was determined by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC). The structure contained two Mg{sup 2+} ions located 10.4 {angstrom} from one another, with one located in the canonical position in the ({beta}/{alpha})7{beta}-barrel domain (although the ligand at the end of the fifth {beta}-strand is His, unprecedented in structurally characterized members of the superfamily); the second is located in a novel site within the capping domain. In silico docking of a library of mono- andmore » diacid sugars to the active site predicted a diacid sugar as a likely substrate. Activity screening of a physical library of acid sugars identified galactarate as the substrate (k{sub cat} = 6.8 s{sup -1}, K{sub M} = 620 {micro}M, k{sub cat}/K{sub M} = 1.1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), allowing functional assignment of Ob2843 as galactarate dehydratase (GalrD-II). The structure of a complex of the catalytically impaired Y90F mutant with Mg{sup 2+} and galactarate allowed identification of a Tyr 164-Arg 162 dyad as the base that initiates the reaction by abstraction of the {alpha}-proton and Tyr 90 as the acid that facilitates departure of the {beta}-OH leaving group. The enzyme product is 2-keto-d-threo-4,5-dihydroxyadipate, the enantiomer of the product obtained in the GalrD reaction catalyzed by a previously characterized bifunctional L-talarate/galactarate dehydratase (TalrD/GalrD). On the basis of the different active site structures and different regiochemistries, we recognize that these functions represent an example of apparent, not actual, convergent evolution of function. The structure of GalrD-II and its active site architecture allow identification of the seventh functionally and structurally characterized subgroup in the enolase superfamily. This study provides an additional example in which an integrated sequence- and structure-based strategy employing computational approaches is a viable approach for directing functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects.« less