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Title: Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (NCSU)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
UNIVERSITY
OSTI Identifier:
1168863
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Environ. Manage.; Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 03, 2015
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Mahoney, Denis J., Gannon, Travis W., Jeffries, Matthew D., Matteson, Audrey R., and Polozzotto, Matthew L.. Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.027.
Mahoney, Denis J., Gannon, Travis W., Jeffries, Matthew D., Matteson, Audrey R., & Polozzotto, Matthew L.. Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.027.
Mahoney, Denis J., Gannon, Travis W., Jeffries, Matthew D., Matteson, Audrey R., and Polozzotto, Matthew L.. Sun . "Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.027.
@article{osti_1168863,
title = {Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass},
author = {Mahoney, Denis J. and Gannon, Travis W. and Jeffries, Matthew D. and Matteson, Audrey R. and Polozzotto, Matthew L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.027},
journal = {J. Environ. Manage.},
number = 03, 2015,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • Uptake and excretion of total arsenic from monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) in workers who applied the herbicide was followed during the spraying season. Urine, blood, and hair samples were collected and air samples were taken from the workers' breathing zone. Arsenic concentrations in air samples ranged from 0.001-1.086 micrograms/m3. Blood and urine arsenic values ranged from 0.0-0.2 mg/L and 0.002-1.725 mg/L, respectively. The geometric mean arsenic concentration in urine increased during the week but returned to base levels on weekends. Hair arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.02-358.0 mg/kg, increased during the spraying season, and returned to pre-season levels once herbicide application ceased.more » Three workers had higher than normal pre-exposure hair values. However, only one of the three workers had consistently above normal values throughout the study period.« less
  • Bioaccumulative and biomagnifying effects of arsenic on crayfish have been reported. However, no work has been done on the chronic effects of this heavy metal on crayfish populations. There is a great concern for MSMA (Monosodium Methanearsonate) herbicide in the vicinity of natural waters due to its high water solubility and bioaccumulative potential. American red crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) account for 98% of the annual crayfish harvest in North America. Those pesticides which have greater water solubility (i.e. MSMA) than other less soluble compounds may cause higher mortalities of aquatic organisms, or cause adverse chronic effects if the non-target animals aremore » sublethally exposed. This work was conducted in the laboratory to assess the possible chronic effects of arsenic on crayfish.« less
  • Like many other heavy metals, arsenic is known to accumulate in the tissues of aquatic organisms including crayfish. One of the earliest reports on red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, reported the bioaccumulation factor (BF) ratios for radioactive sodium methanearsonate to range from 80-480. Other heavy metals, i.e., Cr, Cd, Pb and Hg have also been reported to accumulate experimentally in P. clarkii tissues. This study was conducted to evaluate in the laboratory the bio-accumulative potential of As by the American red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, which is abundant in Louisiana; and also to assess the level of arsenic present in the tissuesmore » of fieldcollected individuals. Total revenues from the sales of this crayfish exceeds $143 million annually.« less
  • Five crops were grown for three seasons following a single soil-incorporated application of MSMA (monosodium methanearsonate). Crop sensitivity to soil arsenic decreased as follows: snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Early Gallatin and Tenderette); rice (Oryza satis L. Dawn and Starbonnet); soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Lee 68); potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. Red LaSoda and Red Pontiac); and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. Stoneville 7A). Over the 3-yr period, yield of snap beans was reduced 8, 14, and 85% below the untreated check where MSMA had been incorporated initially at 22, 45, and 269 kg/ha, respectively. Similar reductions in yield of ricemore » were 18, 25, and 55%. Soybean and potato yields were significantly reduced only at the highest rate of MSMA while cotton yields were unaffected. Arsenic content in the edible portion of the crops decreased as follows: rice, snap beans, potatoes, soybeans, and cotton. The arsenic content in crops from the highest MSMA plots seldom exceeded twice that from the untreated plots .« less