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Title: Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

Abstract

This report addresses the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and the greatest opportunity to reduce these emissions. The IPCC 4 th Assessment Report estimates that globally 35% to 40% of all energy-related CO2 emissions (relative to a growing baseline) result from energy use in buildings. Emissions reductions from a combination of energy efficiency and conservation (using less energy) in buildings have the potential to cut emissions as much as all other energy-using sectors combined. This is especially the case for China, India and other developing countries that are expected to account for 80% or more of growth in building energy use worldwide over the coming decades. In short, buildings constitute the largest opportunity to mitigate climate change and special attention needs to be devoted to developing countries.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C. (United States)
  3. Sustainability Consulting Ltd., London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; ClimateWorks Foundation (United States). Global Building Performance Network
Contributing Org.:
Sustainability Consulting Ltd., London (United Kingdom); American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C. (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1168594
Report Number(s):
LBNL-6006E
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Levine, Mark, de la Rue de Can, Stephane, Zheng, Nina, Williams, Christopher, Amann, Jennifer Thorne, and Staniaszek, Dan. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1168594.
Levine, Mark, de la Rue de Can, Stephane, Zheng, Nina, Williams, Christopher, Amann, Jennifer Thorne, & Staniaszek, Dan. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages. United States. doi:10.2172/1168594.
Levine, Mark, de la Rue de Can, Stephane, Zheng, Nina, Williams, Christopher, Amann, Jennifer Thorne, and Staniaszek, Dan. Fri . "Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages". United States. doi:10.2172/1168594. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1168594.
@article{osti_1168594,
title = {Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages},
author = {Levine, Mark and de la Rue de Can, Stephane and Zheng, Nina and Williams, Christopher and Amann, Jennifer Thorne and Staniaszek, Dan},
abstractNote = {This report addresses the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and the greatest opportunity to reduce these emissions. The IPCC 4th Assessment Report estimates that globally 35% to 40% of all energy-related CO2 emissions (relative to a growing baseline) result from energy use in buildings. Emissions reductions from a combination of energy efficiency and conservation (using less energy) in buildings have the potential to cut emissions as much as all other energy-using sectors combined. This is especially the case for China, India and other developing countries that are expected to account for 80% or more of growth in building energy use worldwide over the coming decades. In short, buildings constitute the largest opportunity to mitigate climate change and special attention needs to be devoted to developing countries.},
doi = {10.2172/1168594},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {10}
}