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Title: Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC); Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1168282
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001293
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nano Lett.; Journal Volume: 14; Related Information: LMI partners with California Institute of Technology (lead); Harvard University; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
solar (photovoltaic), solid state lighting, phonons, thermal conductivity, electrodes - solar, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Zhu, Jia, Hippalgaonkar, Kedar, Shen, Sheng, Wang, Kevin, Abate, Yohannes, Lee, Sangwook, Wu, Junqiao, Yin, Xiaobo, Majumdar, Arun, and Zhang, Xiang. Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/nl502261m.
Zhu, Jia, Hippalgaonkar, Kedar, Shen, Sheng, Wang, Kevin, Abate, Yohannes, Lee, Sangwook, Wu, Junqiao, Yin, Xiaobo, Majumdar, Arun, & Zhang, Xiang. Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control. United States. doi:10.1021/nl502261m.
Zhu, Jia, Hippalgaonkar, Kedar, Shen, Sheng, Wang, Kevin, Abate, Yohannes, Lee, Sangwook, Wu, Junqiao, Yin, Xiaobo, Majumdar, Arun, and Zhang, Xiang. Wed . "Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control". United States. doi:10.1021/nl502261m.
@article{osti_1168282,
title = {Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control},
author = {Zhu, Jia and Hippalgaonkar, Kedar and Shen, Sheng and Wang, Kevin and Abate, Yohannes and Lee, Sangwook and Wu, Junqiao and Yin, Xiaobo and Majumdar, Arun and Zhang, Xiang},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/nl502261m},
journal = {Nano Lett.},
number = ,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 13 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 13 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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