skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

Abstract

At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigationmore » and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
Contributing Org.:
CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office
OSTI Identifier:
1167470
Report Number(s):
SGW-58170-FP Rev 0
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC06-08RL14788
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2015 Waste Management Symposia 03/15/2015 - 03/19/2015 Phoenix, AZ
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Carlson, Mark A., Nielsen, Kellin R., Byrnes, Mark E., Simmons, Sally A., Morse, John J., Geiger, James B., Watkins, Louis E., McFee, Phillip M., and Martins, K. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Carlson, Mark A., Nielsen, Kellin R., Byrnes, Mark E., Simmons, Sally A., Morse, John J., Geiger, James B., Watkins, Louis E., McFee, Phillip M., & Martins, K. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water. United States.
Carlson, Mark A., Nielsen, Kellin R., Byrnes, Mark E., Simmons, Sally A., Morse, John J., Geiger, James B., Watkins, Louis E., McFee, Phillip M., and Martins, K. Wed . "Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1167470.
@article{osti_1167470,
title = {Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water},
author = {Carlson, Mark A. and Nielsen, Kellin R. and Byrnes, Mark E. and Simmons, Sally A. and Morse, John J. and Geiger, James B. and Watkins, Louis E. and McFee, Phillip M. and Martins, K.},
abstractNote = {At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 14 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Wed Jan 14 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: