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Title: Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption

Abstract

G-Demption, LLC has requested that PPNL provide design input for a “pseudo-glassification” process associated with their proposed technology for generating gamma irradiation stations from used nuclear fuel. The irradiation design currently consists of an aluminum enclosure designed to allow for proper encapsulation of and heat flow from a used fuel rod while minimally impacting the streaming of gamma rays from the fuel. In order to make their design more robust, G-Demption is investigating the benefits of backfilling this aluminum enclosure with a setting material once the used fuel rod is properly placed. This process has been initially referred to as “pseudo-glassification”, and strives not to impact heat transport or gamma streaming from the used fuel rod while providing increased fuel rod protection and fission gas retention. PNNL has compiled an internal material evaluation and discussion for the “pseudo-glassification” process in this report.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1167309
Report Number(s):
PNNL-23706
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; G-Demption; Pseudo-glassification

Citation Formats

Casella, Andrew M., Buck, Edgar C., Gates, Robert O., and Riley, Brian J. Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1167309.
Casella, Andrew M., Buck, Edgar C., Gates, Robert O., & Riley, Brian J. Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption. United States. doi:10.2172/1167309.
Casella, Andrew M., Buck, Edgar C., Gates, Robert O., and Riley, Brian J. Mon . "Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption". United States. doi:10.2172/1167309. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1167309.
@article{osti_1167309,
title = {Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption},
author = {Casella, Andrew M. and Buck, Edgar C. and Gates, Robert O. and Riley, Brian J.},
abstractNote = {G-Demption, LLC has requested that PPNL provide design input for a “pseudo-glassification” process associated with their proposed technology for generating gamma irradiation stations from used nuclear fuel. The irradiation design currently consists of an aluminum enclosure designed to allow for proper encapsulation of and heat flow from a used fuel rod while minimally impacting the streaming of gamma rays from the fuel. In order to make their design more robust, G-Demption is investigating the benefits of backfilling this aluminum enclosure with a setting material once the used fuel rod is properly placed. This process has been initially referred to as “pseudo-glassification”, and strives not to impact heat transport or gamma streaming from the used fuel rod while providing increased fuel rod protection and fission gas retention. PNNL has compiled an internal material evaluation and discussion for the “pseudo-glassification” process in this report.},
doi = {10.2172/1167309},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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