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Title: Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

Abstract

The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
NNSA (National Nuclear Security Administration)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1167036
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; HIGH EXPLOSIVES; BEEF; TESTING FACILITY; STOCKPILE STEWARDSHIP

Citation Formats

None. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
None. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF. United States.
None. 2014. "Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1167036.
@article{osti_1167036,
title = {Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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