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Title: Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research

Abstract

Final technical/scientific report for the project, Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Academy of Science, Washington DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Academy of Science, Washington DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1165984
Report Number(s):
DOE-NAS-0007960-1
DOE Contract Number:
SC0007960
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fryberger, Teresa. Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1165984.
Fryberger, Teresa. Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research. United States. doi:10.2172/1165984.
Fryberger, Teresa. 2014. "Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research". United States. doi:10.2172/1165984. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1165984.
@article{osti_1165984,
title = {Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research},
author = {Fryberger, Teresa},
abstractNote = {Final technical/scientific report for the project, Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Chemistry Laboratory Research.},
doi = {10.2172/1165984},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modestmore » and less regular.« less
  • Since World War II, a new environmental problem has been created by the electromagnetic emissions from microwave frequency generators used for communications, radio-navigation, military applications, diathermy, food ovens, and other industrial purposes. Past research has established the thermal hazard of such emissions, particularly on temperature-sensitive systems such as the avascular eye lens and the male gonads. On this basis, ANSI in 1966 recommended a safety level of 10 mW/sq. cm for both pulsed and continuous wave radiation in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 100 GHz for periods greater than 0.1 hour. This guide was subsequently adopted by Occupationalmore » Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). There are no specific exposure recommendations, however, for the general population. Research to resolve these problems includes: Epidemiologic and clinical investigations of microwave effects on man both at high and lower power densities; chronic low-level studies of animals exposed to power densities; determination of the basic mechanisms of radio frequency effects on molecular and cellular components and the loci interaction as a function of power density; surveys to systematically evaluate the frequencies and intensities of electromagnetic radiation in the environment; and studies to relate the biological effects of microwaves to quantitative measurements of absorbed power.« less
  • This environmental statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) in support of the Energy Research and Development Administration's (ERDA) proposal for legislative authorization and appropriations for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability ofmore » various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evalution of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-scale deployment of the FBR.« less
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  • This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.