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Title: Bacterial Genome Reference Databases: Progress and Challenges

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1165765
Report Number(s):
LLNL-PROC-659520
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: November 2013 PDA Meeting, Bethesda, MD, United States, Nov 12 - Nov 15, 2013
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 97 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Slezak, T. Bacterial Genome Reference Databases: Progress and Challenges. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Slezak, T. Bacterial Genome Reference Databases: Progress and Challenges. United States.
Slezak, T. Wed . "Bacterial Genome Reference Databases: Progress and Challenges". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1165765.
@article{osti_1165765,
title = {Bacterial Genome Reference Databases: Progress and Challenges},
author = {Slezak, T},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
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