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Title: Intra-aggregate Pore Structure Influences Phylogenetic Composition of Bacterial Community in Macroaggregates

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (UC)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NSFUSDA
OSTI Identifier:
1164173
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: (6) ; 11, 2014
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Kravchenko, Alexandra N., Negassa, Wakene C., Guber, Andrey K., Hildebrandt, Britton, Marsh, Terence L., Rivers, Mark L., and MSU). Intra-aggregate Pore Structure Influences Phylogenetic Composition of Bacterial Community in Macroaggregates. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2136/sssaj2014.07.0308.
Kravchenko, Alexandra N., Negassa, Wakene C., Guber, Andrey K., Hildebrandt, Britton, Marsh, Terence L., Rivers, Mark L., & MSU). Intra-aggregate Pore Structure Influences Phylogenetic Composition of Bacterial Community in Macroaggregates. United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2014.07.0308.
Kravchenko, Alexandra N., Negassa, Wakene C., Guber, Andrey K., Hildebrandt, Britton, Marsh, Terence L., Rivers, Mark L., and MSU). 2016. "Intra-aggregate Pore Structure Influences Phylogenetic Composition of Bacterial Community in Macroaggregates". United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2014.07.0308.
@article{osti_1164173,
title = {Intra-aggregate Pore Structure Influences Phylogenetic Composition of Bacterial Community in Macroaggregates},
author = {Kravchenko, Alexandra N. and Negassa, Wakene C. and Guber, Andrey K. and Hildebrandt, Britton and Marsh, Terence L. and Rivers, Mark L. and MSU)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.2136/sssaj2014.07.0308},
journal = {Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.},
number = (6) ; 11, 2014,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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