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Title: The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

Abstract

Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R 2:C 2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R 2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-bindingmore » domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CSMB)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1163593
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 289; Journal Issue: 41; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9258
Publisher:
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; cyclic AMP (cAMP); intrinsically disordered protein; protein domain; protein dynamic; protein kinase A (PKA); protein structure; small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS); small angle neutron scattering (SANS)

Citation Formats

Blumenthal, Donald K., Copps, Jeffrey, Smith-Nguyen, Eric V., Zhang, Ping, Heller, William T., and Taylor, Susan S. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1074/jbc.M114.584177.
Blumenthal, Donald K., Copps, Jeffrey, Smith-Nguyen, Eric V., Zhang, Ping, Heller, William T., & Taylor, Susan S. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study. United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M114.584177.
Blumenthal, Donald K., Copps, Jeffrey, Smith-Nguyen, Eric V., Zhang, Ping, Heller, William T., and Taylor, Susan S. Mon . "The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study". United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M114.584177. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1163593.
@article{osti_1163593,
title = {The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study},
author = {Blumenthal, Donald K. and Copps, Jeffrey and Smith-Nguyen, Eric V. and Zhang, Ping and Heller, William T. and Taylor, Susan S.},
abstractNote = {Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.},
doi = {10.1074/jbc.M114.584177},
journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
number = 41,
volume = 289,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Aug 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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