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Title: KIF14 Binds Tightly to Microtubules and Adopts a Rigor-Like Conformation

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1162695
Report Number(s):
BNL-106641-2014-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2836
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Molecular Biology; Journal Volume: 426; Journal Issue: 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Arora, K., Talje, L., Asenjo, A., Andersen, P., Atchia, K., Joshi, M., Sosa, H., Allingham, J., and Kwok, B. KIF14 Binds Tightly to Microtubules and Adopts a Rigor-Like Conformation. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2014.05.030.
Arora, K., Talje, L., Asenjo, A., Andersen, P., Atchia, K., Joshi, M., Sosa, H., Allingham, J., & Kwok, B. KIF14 Binds Tightly to Microtubules and Adopts a Rigor-Like Conformation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2014.05.030.
Arora, K., Talje, L., Asenjo, A., Andersen, P., Atchia, K., Joshi, M., Sosa, H., Allingham, J., and Kwok, B. Fri . "KIF14 Binds Tightly to Microtubules and Adopts a Rigor-Like Conformation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2014.05.030.
@article{osti_1162695,
title = {KIF14 Binds Tightly to Microtubules and Adopts a Rigor-Like Conformation},
author = {Arora, K. and Talje, L. and Asenjo, A. and Andersen, P. and Atchia, K. and Joshi, M. and Sosa, H. and Allingham, J. and Kwok, B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmb.2014.05.030},
journal = {Journal of Molecular Biology},
number = 17,
volume = 426,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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