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Title: Impedance Spectroscopy on Copper Phthalocyanine Diodes with Surface-Induced Molecular Orientation

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1162661
Report Number(s):
BNL-106607-2014-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1566-1199
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Organic Electronics; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kim, C., Hlaing, H., Yang, S., Bonnassieux, Y., Horowitz, G., and Kymissis, I. Impedance Spectroscopy on Copper Phthalocyanine Diodes with Surface-Induced Molecular Orientation. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.orgel.2014.04.039.
Kim, C., Hlaing, H., Yang, S., Bonnassieux, Y., Horowitz, G., & Kymissis, I. Impedance Spectroscopy on Copper Phthalocyanine Diodes with Surface-Induced Molecular Orientation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.orgel.2014.04.039.
Kim, C., Hlaing, H., Yang, S., Bonnassieux, Y., Horowitz, G., and Kymissis, I. Fri . "Impedance Spectroscopy on Copper Phthalocyanine Diodes with Surface-Induced Molecular Orientation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.orgel.2014.04.039.
@article{osti_1162661,
title = {Impedance Spectroscopy on Copper Phthalocyanine Diodes with Surface-Induced Molecular Orientation},
author = {Kim, C. and Hlaing, H. and Yang, S. and Bonnassieux, Y. and Horowitz, G. and Kymissis, I.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.orgel.2014.04.039},
journal = {Organic Electronics},
number = 8,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • The systematic features of laser-induced desorption from an SnO{sub 2} surface exposed to 10-ns pulsed neodymium laser radiation are studied at the photon energy 2.34 eV, in the range of pulse energy densities 1 to 50 mJ/cm{sup 2}. As the threshold pulse energy 28 mJ/cm{sup 2} is achieved, molecular oxygen O{sub 2} is detected in the desorption mass spectra from the SnO{sub 2} surface; as the threshold pulse energy 42 mJ/cm{sup 2} is reached, tin Sn, and SnO and (SnO){sub 2} particle desorption is observed. The laser desorption mass spectra from the SnO{sub 2} surface coated with an organic coppermore » phthalocyanine (CuPc) film 50 nm thick are measured. It is shown that laser irradiation causes the fragmentation of CuPc molecules and the desorption of molecular fragments in the laser pulse energy density range 6 to 10 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Along with the desorption of molecular fragments, a weak desorption signal of the substrate components O{sub 2}, Sn, SnO, and (SnO){sub 2} is observed in the same energy range. Desorption energy thresholds of substrate atomic components from the organic film surface are approximately five times lower than thresholds of their desorption from the atomically clean SnO{sub 2} surface, which indicates the diffusion of atomic components of the SnO{sub 2} substrate to the bulk of the deposited organic film.« less
  • The interface electronic structures of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been studied using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy as different monolayers of C{sub 60} were inserted between CuPc and a SiO{sub 2} or highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate. The results show that CuPc has standing up configuration with one monolayer of C{sub 60} insertion on SiO{sub 2} while lying down on HOPG, indicating that the insertion layer propagates the CuPc-substrate interaction. Meanwhile, CuPc on more than one monolayers of C{sub 60} on different substrates show that the substrate orientation effect quickly vanished. Our study elucidates intriguing molecular interactions that manipulate molecular orientationmore » and donor-acceptor energy level alignment.« less
  • The adsorption of up to one monolayer (ML) of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on a room temperature Cu(111) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Below 1 ML the molecules are in a fluid state and are highly mobile on the surface. At 1 ML coverage the molecules coalesce into a highly ordered 2D crystal phase. At sub-ML coverages, chemisorption of individual CuPc molecules can be induced through exposure to tunneling electrons at a tunneling bias voltage exceeding a threshold value. This tunneling electron induced effect has been exploited to perform molecular STM lithography.