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Title: The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

Abstract

Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1162231
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-14-31753
Journal ID: ISSN 0736-6299
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0736-6299
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; electronic scrap; gold; mesoporous carbons; palladium; precious metals recovery

Citation Formats

Zalupski, Peter R., McDowell, Rocklan, and Dutech, Guy. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1080/07366299.2014.951278.
Zalupski, Peter R., McDowell, Rocklan, & Dutech, Guy. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.. United States. doi:10.1080/07366299.2014.951278.
Zalupski, Peter R., McDowell, Rocklan, and Dutech, Guy. Tue . "The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.". United States. doi:10.1080/07366299.2014.951278. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1162231.
@article{osti_1162231,
title = {The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.},
author = {Zalupski, Peter R. and McDowell, Rocklan and Dutech, Guy},
abstractNote = {Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.},
doi = {10.1080/07366299.2014.951278},
journal = {Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange},
number = 7,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 2works
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