skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Low-Cost, Durable, High-Performance Reflectors for Utility-Scale Solar Thermal Energy Collection

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ReflecTech, Inc.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1162135
Report Number(s):
DOE-REFLECTECH-0002260
DOE Contract Number:
SC0002260
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; Reflectors; Replacement Mirrors; LS2 Reflectors, ReflecTech, Polymer Mirrors

Citation Formats

Gee, Randy, Farr, Adrian, Mason, Alison, Thomson, Shannon, Viljoen, Nolan, White, David, and Zhu, Guangdong. Low-Cost, Durable, High-Performance Reflectors for Utility-Scale Solar Thermal Energy Collection. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Gee, Randy, Farr, Adrian, Mason, Alison, Thomson, Shannon, Viljoen, Nolan, White, David, & Zhu, Guangdong. Low-Cost, Durable, High-Performance Reflectors for Utility-Scale Solar Thermal Energy Collection. United States.
Gee, Randy, Farr, Adrian, Mason, Alison, Thomson, Shannon, Viljoen, Nolan, White, David, and Zhu, Guangdong. Tue . "Low-Cost, Durable, High-Performance Reflectors for Utility-Scale Solar Thermal Energy Collection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1162135,
title = {Low-Cost, Durable, High-Performance Reflectors for Utility-Scale Solar Thermal Energy Collection},
author = {Gee, Randy and Farr, Adrian and Mason, Alison and Thomson, Shannon and Viljoen, Nolan and White, David and Zhu, Guangdong},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Oct 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be protected. To request the document, click here.
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • The primary project objective was development of improved polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) which address the key DOE barriers of performance, durability and cost. Additional project objectives were to address commercialization barriers specific to MEAs comprising 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF) electrodes, including a larger-than-acceptable sensitivity to operating conditions, an unexplained loss of rated power capability with operating time, and slow break-in conditioning. Significant progress was made against each of these barriers, and most DOE 2020 targets were met or substantially approached.
  • Other than the SEGS I-IX parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or "utility-scale" solar projects-defined here to include any ground-mounted photovoltaic ("PV"), concentrating photovoltaic ("CPV"), or concentrating solar power ("CSP" or solar thermal) project larger than 5 MW AC-existed in the United States prior to 2007.
  • Other than the nine Solar Energy Generation Systems (“SEGS”) parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or “utility-scale” solar projects – defined here to include any groundmounted photovoltaic (“PV”), concentrating photovoltaic (“CPV”), or concentrating solar thermal power (“CSP”) project larger than 5 MW AC – existed in the United States prior to 2007. By 2012 – just five years later – utility-scale had become the largest sector of the overall PV market in the United States, a distinction that was repeated in both 2013 and 2014 and that is expected to continue for at least the nextmore » few years. Over this same short period, CSP also experienced a bit of a renaissance in the United States, with a number of large new parabolic trough and power tower systems – some including thermal storage – achieving commercial operation. With this critical mass of new utility-scale projects now online and in some cases having operated for a number of years (generating not only electricity, but also empirical data that can be mined), the rapidly growing utility-scale sector is ripe for analysis. This report, the third edition in an ongoing annual series, meets this need through in-depth, annually updated, data-driven analysis of not just installed project costs or prices – i.e., the traditional realm of solar economics analyses – but also operating costs, capacity factors, and power purchase agreement (“PPA”) prices from a large sample of utility-scale solar projects in the United States. Given its current dominance in the market, utility-scale PV also dominates much of this report, though data from CPV and CSP projects are presented where appropriate.« less
  • The utility-scale solar sector—defined here to include any ground-mounted photovoltaic (“PV”), concentrating photovoltaic (“CPV”), or concentrating solar power (“CSP”) project that is larger than 5 MWAC in capacity—has led the overall U.S. solar market in terms of installed capacity since 2012. It is expected to maintain its market-leading position for at least another five years, driven in part by December 2015’s three-year extension of the 30% federal investment tax credit (“ITC”) through 2019 (coupled with a favorable switch to a “start construction” rather than a “placed in service” eligibility requirement, and a gradual phase down of the credit to 10%more » by 2022). In fact, in 2016 alone, the utility-scale sector is projected to install more than twice as much new capacity as it ever has previously in a single year. This unprecedented boom makes it difficult, yet more important than ever, to stay abreast of the latest utility-scale market developments and trends. This report—the fourth edition in an ongoing annual series—is intended to help meet this need, by providing in-depth, annually updated, data-driven analysis of the utility-scale solar project fleet in the United States. Drawing on empirical project-level data from a wide range of sources, this report analyzes not just installed project costs or prices—i.e., the traditional realm of most solar economic analyses—but also operating costs, capacity factors, and power purchase agreement (“PPA”) prices from a large sample of utility-scale solar projects throughout the United States. Given its current dominance in the market, utility-scale PV also dominates much of this report, though data from CPV and CSP projects are also presented where appropriate.« less