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Title: Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

Abstract

Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1159444
Report Number(s):
SAND2014-18345
537910
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Yocky, David A., Doren, Neall E., Bacon, Terry A., Wahl, Daniel E., Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Charles V,, Delaplain, Gilbert G., Dubbert, Dale F., Tise, Bertice L., and White, Kyle R.. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1159444.
Yocky, David A., Doren, Neall E., Bacon, Terry A., Wahl, Daniel E., Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Charles V,, Delaplain, Gilbert G., Dubbert, Dale F., Tise, Bertice L., & White, Kyle R.. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.. United States. doi:10.2172/1159444.
Yocky, David A., Doren, Neall E., Bacon, Terry A., Wahl, Daniel E., Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Charles V,, Delaplain, Gilbert G., Dubbert, Dale F., Tise, Bertice L., and White, Kyle R.. Wed . "Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.". United States. doi:10.2172/1159444. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1159444.
@article{osti_1159444,
title = {Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.},
author = {Yocky, David A. and Doren, Neall E. and Bacon, Terry A. and Wahl, Daniel E. and Eichel, Paul H. and Jakowatz, Charles V, and Delaplain, Gilbert G. and Dubbert, Dale F. and Tise, Bertice L. and White, Kyle R.},
abstractNote = {Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.},
doi = {10.2172/1159444},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-colormore » multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.« less
  • This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013more » on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.« less
  • The report is organized as follows: Section II contains a discussion of the meeting procedures used on October 16--18, 1978, and the rules employed for technical consultants and advisors to the CRC. Section III contains a discussion of the CRC recommendations and some of the factors taken into consideration by the Committee. Section IV briefly discusses where do we go from here in DOE's alternate concepts program.